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Mundus Liber Questionnaire #1 (LGBT Rights)


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Hello Europa! Mundus Liber is up and at it again; now focusing on a specific area: LGBT Rights. Below is a questionnaire that's quick and simple. I'll take answers by posting here, DMing me on Discord or the Forums, Answer and tag me on the discord (where I will also be posting this) or just somehow get them to me. Please take just ten minutes out of your day to answer this, data such as this will be a valuable tool for us to understand how our world compares to the real one and how each of us compare to each other. Without further ado, here's the questions:

 

Mundus Liber LGBT Rights Questionnaire:

 

1.       What is your country’s general views on homosexuality?

 

2.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against homosexuals? Please explain how.

 

3.       What is your country’s general views on bisexual individuals?

 

4.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against bisexual individuals? Please explain how.

 

5.       What is your country’s general views on transgender individuals?

 

6.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against transgender individuals? Please explain how.

 

7.       Why does your country take these stances on LGBT individuals? Please explain thoroughly.

 

8.       Any more notes on the way the LGBT community is treated in your country?

 

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(OOC: I had started answering each question, but it turns out most of my answers were always the same.)

1+3+5+7. What is your country’s general views on homosexuality, bisexual individuals, transgender individuals, and LGBT individuals?

Sexual preference is not a subject of debate. Much like with religion, asking about or suggesting someone's sexual preference is frowned upon. There is a much clearer distinction between native and foreigner, based on where people are coming from.

2+4+6+8. Do your laws protect or discriminate against these groups? Please explain how.

What you would consider being "anti-discrimination laws" apply to the differences in clan lineage, age, the order of birth, and religious devotion. Also protected by not explicitly mentioned are taboo topics such as: gender, sexuality, income, political preference. There does still exist a large undertone of discrimination against men who seek positions of power, notably in politics.

In the past, there have been some minor conflicts with the Tacolic Church not permitting women in their leadership, but these affairs have been resolved now. This exclusion of women was perceived as a clear affront to traditional matriarchy in Orioni.

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1.       What is your country’s general views on homosexuality?

We do not talk about it.

 

2.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against homosexuals? Please explain how.

They are first subjected to evaluation and reeducation, if they are deemed beyond saving the females are render unable to derive pleasure from beastly acts and sold off as concubines while the men are gelded and sold off as slaves for their transgressions against the Emperor. If they prove unruly, they are subjected to conditioning and pacification surgeries to make them more amicable to their new lots in life.

 

3.       What is your country’s general views on bisexual individuals?

We do not talk about it.

 

4.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against bisexual individuals? Please explain how.

Please refer to the second answer.

 

5.       What is your country’s general views on transgender individuals?

These do not exist.

 

6.       Do your laws protect or discriminate against transgender individuals? Please explain how.

If it is just some girl pretending to be a boy, we generally ignore them and let them go their merry way so that their husband or father can sort them out. If they carry out unnatural acts though or if they cause trouble by refusing to marry and/or do their Emperor given duties, we carry out two rounds of psychiatric treatment. Failing this reeducation and conditioning is attempted, before we finally move onto surgical procedures.

 

7.       Why does your country take these stances on LGBT individuals? Please explain thoroughly.

They are unnatural and need to be treated. Men need to father children so that they might be replaced in time, women need to carry these children and rear them so that they might live, and until an economical solution can be found which renders childbirth an inefficient means of reproduction and troop replenishment, we will continue to carry out our methods of treatment. Lives are the Emperor's currency, spend them well.

 

8.       Any more notes on the way the LGBT community is treated in your country?

Getting up on a stage in a dress and some make up does not make a man a woman or in any way, shape, or form lead to punishment or medical attention unless done so in inappropriate settings and times. Having some stupid fun like that because the prettiest thing around is the ass about to be butchered for your week's food is considered normal and healthy behaviour, and it is also not uncommon for men to play female roles as there has been a sharp decline in actresses since more conservative elements have started calling for the outlawing of prostitution in most places.

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1. Homos are commonly beaten up and abused.

2. They discriminate.

3. They think that they are confused.

4. Discriminate less, but still largely discriminated.

5. They think they're freaks of society.

6. Discriminated fiercely.

7. They are people against the traditional family, and are largely liberal.

8. nope

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1. What is your country’s general views on homosexuality?

Generally, Tagmatium is relatively split on its perception of homosexuality. On the one hand, it is a Christian nation ruled over by an autocratic monarch who is held to be the representative of God on Eurth. As such, homosexuality, at least open displays of it, are frowned upon. If same-sex couples were to have open displays of affection in restaurants or other public places, there is the likelihood that they may be asked to leave the premises, especially if the other clientele were of the older generations.

Acculturation from other nations, as much as the Megas Agios Basileia Arhomanion tends to look down on other cultures, has meant that younger generations are becoming a lot more familiar with the idea of same-sex relationships being allowed to be more open that they have in the past.

As explained below, there may be a level of ostracisation if someone within certain professions were to come out – if they were a teacher, for example, parents may ask for their children to be removed from their classes.

2. Do your laws protect or discriminate against homosexuals? Please explain how.

In the main, laws do not protect homosexuals – it was mainly decriminalised and there is certainly an atmosphere of “don't ask, don't tell” amongst the wider population. A homosexual couple would not get arrested in public for holding hands, and they are unlikely to be physically assaulted, apart from the more backwoods areas of the countryside.

There are anti-discrimination laws against that, but it would very much depend on the locality. Some parts of the country are significantly more progressive than others, especially the big cities, such as Tagmatika, Petrion or Prousa. There, people would likely not comment much on it.

3. What is your country's general views on bisexual individuals?

They are considered to be an oddity – neither fish nor fowl. To a greater or lesser extent, especially amongst younger people, there is the perception that it is people “experimenting”, but there can be a lot of pressure to conform to the ideal of the Tagmatine – church-going, patriotic and family-oriented.

4. Do your laws protect or discriminate against bisexual individuals? Please explain how.

Again, there is no real discrimination – there is just no real protection, either. It often depends on the area of the country that one is in.

5. What is your country's general views on transexual individuals?

It isn't a thing that is recognised officially within the Megas Agios Basileia Arhomanion, but that is likely changing. Due to the increasing wealth of published medical material on the subject, this is perhaps the area of LGBT that is changing the quickest, with perhaps surprisingly little opposition from the Church. The Agios Basilikon Kounsistorion is even considering changing the law to make it easier for individuals to alter their birth certificates to reflect their true genders, once they have undergone both medical and psychological examinations.

The average member of the public might greet this topic with some confusion, however.

6. Do your laws protect or discriminate against transexual individuals? Please explain how.

Laws, as they stand, do not allow someone to change their gender legally. At all. But this actually might be changing.

7. Why does your country take these stances on LGBT individuals? Please explain thoroughly.

The 20th Century was a remarkably turbulent period for Tagmatium. A generation-long war led to the first real democracy that the Megas Agios Basileia Arhomanion ever had, started by a coup of officers and soldiers from said war. This led to a liberalisation of the culture of the country, which led to a left-wing Holy Emperor being elected. This period saw many of the laws of a discriminatory nature being struck off the books, a move that was supported by the Patriarch of Tagmatika, who was known for progressive views. This, however, didn't last long – in the early 1970s this regime was overthrown by a conservative faction from the aristocracy, led in part by a cabal of military officers. This saw a much more traditionalist view of gender relations put back in place.

However, the 1990s saw another coup, this time by the son of the more left-wing emperor. Once again, a wave of liberalisation happened, and progressive laws were enacted. That is, progressive for a devoutly Christian nation, one that has a strong influence from a politically-powerful state religion. Whilst Kommodos III has shown no personal inclinations to buckle to the occasional pressure from the church to enact harsher laws, neither has he tried to open the Megas Agios Basileia Arhomanion up to more equal rights for minority sexualities.

Any foreigner is actually more likely to be given leeway than a native-born Tagmatine – they're all barbaroi, after all.

8. Any more notes on the way the LGBT community is treated in your country.

Nope, I think I've covered it.

(Don't hit me again, @Mauridiviah! Please!)

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