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Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing


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Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing, officially Skandinavisk Flyindustri A/S, is an Andallan aerospace company that designs, manufactures and sells both civilian and military aircraft. Skandinavisk is the largest company in Andalla and among the largest in Thalassa by revenue, total assets, and employees. At the end of FY 2017, the company reported $43.568 billion in revenues, $72.133 billion in total assets, and nearly 86,000 employees worldwide—67,442 in Andalla and Giokto. Skandinavisk aircraft are delivered to customers across the world, with major final assembly plants located in Andalla, and @Limonaia. The company's international headquarters are located in the Skandinavisk Global Tower along Antonsen Avenue in downtown Arkhavn, with regional head offices in Nordhaven (Orioni), Toledo (Iverica), Limone (Limonaia) and Feerefaaierhafen (Variota).

The company was founded on 2 September 1907 by Markus Olstad, along with the same group of engineers who built the first successful Andallan powered aircraft  the Olstad Flyer. Wilbert Vernesen, the first Andallan pilot on a powered aircraft, served as the company's chief pilot and trained several more to become the very first Andallan pilots. The first Skandinavisk-built aircraft was the Model 1, a small experimental biplane based off the Olstad Flyer. The company soon began producing general-purpose biplanes, the most popular of which were the "P-series" mailplanes. In the early 1920s, the company began to venture into larger commercial aircraft. Throughout the 1930s, focus was gradually shifted from general-purpose aircraft to the much larger airliners. Skandinavisk competed very closely with Saeb, which later ventured into flying boats to address the needs of the archipelago. However, as the popularity of flying boats began to diminish, Saeb ultimately lost its foothold in the large airliner market. Meanwhile, Skandinavisk had introduced the very successful "SK-series" airliners, cementing its position at the top of the Thalassan aerospace industry. The company entered the jet age after Saeb was forced to sell its jet fighter project due to the rapidly-falling demand for military equipment after the Thalassan War. Soon later, Skandinavisk entered the commercial jet age with the classic SK-3. It was at this time that Skandinavisk began to grow rapidly, producing several more jet airliners, all of which were successful. In the early 1980s, Skandinavisk formed a joint venture with Khiimori Aeronautics of @Fulgistan to develop and manufacture the SK-7. The SK-7 project was only beginning design studies at that time, and the newly-formed KAS Aerospace took over development. Along with KAS Aerospace, Skandinavisk remains one of the world's largest and most prominent civil aviation manufacturers.


Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing is subdivided into 5 major divisions:

  • Skandinavisk Global, primary manufacturer of SK-series airliners; based in Finkenveder, Andalla, with a second final assembly plant in Tailam, Giokto.
  • Skandinavisk Argis, manufacturer of SK-series airliners; based in Limone, Limonaia.
  • Skandinavisk Defense, military division of Skandinavisk; based in Vindtorp, Andalla.
  • Skandinavisk Europa, manufactures general-purpose aircraft; based in Nordhaven, Orioni.
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EARLY AIRCRAFT


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The Olstad Flyer was the very first Andallan heavier-than-air powered aircraft. It was designed and built primarily by Markus Olstad and some friends, among them Wilbert Verneson who manned the first powered flight by an Andallan on the Ikaropoulos. The Flyer first flew on December 18, 1906 with Verneson at the controls, while subsequent flights were flown by other men that Verneson had trained.

Born 20 August 1875 in the small town of Skandinav, Wilbert Verneson moved to Tagmatium in 1893 in search of a better life following the death of both his parents in a fire. After endless searching, Verneson found long-term employment with Ioannes Glauketes as a chauffeur. In January of 1903, he was among the first people to be trained on Glauketes' flying machine. Months later, Wilbert Verneson became the first Andallan and non-Europan pilot of a powered aircraft when he piloted the Ikaropoulos' 4th flight. News of the first Andallan pilot crossed the Oriental Ocean quickly, and the entire nation was captivated by the newfound technology. Verneson returned home to a hero's welcome a year later, after being paid handsomely by Glauketes. Soon after, Verneson met engineer and neighbor Markus Olstad who, with some friends, was planning to build his own flying machine. The Flyer began actual development in 1905, while Olstad had already been working on a homemade V8 engine.

The Olstad Flyer's first flight took place in the early hours of 18 December 1906, in a field just outside Skandinav owned by one of Olstad's friends. Contrary to the Ikaropoulos, the Flyer's first flight was witnessed by nearly a thousand people, including several members of the press from several major Andallan newspapers. The Flyer flew 121 meters (397 feet) at a height of 6 meters (20 feet), becoming the first Andallan heavier-than-air powered flight. It was a groundbreaking success, and numerous photographs of the first flight were taken. The Flyer soon became known across the region owing to the wide publicity received by the event, which led Olstad to formally establish an aircraft company in 1907 — Skandinavisk. The company derived its name from the colloquial demonym of the town, as the Flyer project received much support from fellow town-mates during development.

In the months leading up to the first flight, Verneson had trained Olstad and a number of his friends to fly the aircraft as well. Subsequent flights were flown by Verneson's recruits, while Verneson became Skandinavisk's chief pilot until his retirement in 1937.

While the Flyer was completed before the founding of Skandinavisk, it was listed under the company's assets as a test aircraft for later designs. In 1909, the Flyer was upgraded with a new undercarriage and more powerful 50 hp engine. It was retired in 1914 and remains on active display at the Skandinavisk Finkenveder Factory.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Length: 8.36 m
  • Wingspan: 12.95 m
  • Height: 2.14 m
 
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UTILITY AIRCRAFT


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The Model 10 is a two-seat, single-engine general aviation aircraft. It first flew in 1947 and was the first mass-produced Skandinavisk aircraft. Production began in 1948 and an estimated 980 were built across 16 years. It was Skandinavisk's first large financial success and paved the way for the designing of the first Skandinavisk airliner, the SK-1.

VARIANTS

  • Model 10 (1948 - 1953)
  • Model 11 (1954 - 1960)
  • Model 12 (1960 - 1963)
  • L-10 (1962 - 1964)

SPECIFICATIONS (Model 10)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 1
  • Length: 6.55 m
  • Wingspan: 10.16 m
  • Height: 1.91 m
  • Cruise Speed: 171 km/h
  • Top Speed: 202 km/h
  • Range: 728 km
  • Service Ceiling: 15,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (L-10)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 1
  • Length: 6.63 m
  • Wingspan: 10.57 m
  • Height: 1.87 m
  • Cruise Speed: 193 km/h
  • Top Speed: 219 km/h
  • Range: 760 km
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 ft

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The L-20 Ravn is a four-seat, single-engine, high-wing utility aircraft, and is one of Skandinavisk's most successful aircraft. First flown in 1962, more than 7,000 aircraft have been built since then. The sheer popularity of the aircraft has earned it the nickname "lille fugl", or "little bird". Dozens of variants have been created over the years, ensuring the L-20 to be up-to-date with modern technology and capabilities despite the model itself being over 50 years old. Most L-20 aircraft are owned privately. It has also found a home with military users as border patrol aircraft or trainers, however very few are in service as such.

VARIANTS

  • L-20A (1962 - 1964)
  • L-20B (1963 - 1971)
  • L-20C (1969 - 1987)
  • L-20D (1987 - 1995)
  • L-20E (1992 - 2008)
  • L-20F (2007 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (L-20F)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 3
  • Length: 8.32 m
  • Wingspan: 11.2 m
  • Height: 2.73 m
  • Cruise Speed: 227 km/h
  • Top Speed: 306 km/h
  • Range: 1,293 km
  • Service Ceiling: 18,500 ft

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The L-30 Ørn is a six-seat, twin-engine turboprop general aviation aircraft. Skandinavisk's second most widely-produced aircraft after the L-20, it first flew in 1972 and remains in production. 2,600 aircraft have been produced as of August 2017.

VARIANTS

  • L-30A (1974 - 1978)
  • L-30B (1977 - 1989)
  • L-30C (1990 - 2002)
  • L-30D (2002 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (L-30D)

  • Crew: 1-2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 6
  • Length: 11.09 m
  • Wingspan: 12.56 m
  • Height: 3.52 m
  • Cruise Speed: 448 km/h
  • Top Speed: 481 km/h
  • Range: 2,759 km
  • Service Ceiling: 30,300 ft


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SK-SERIES AIRCRAFT


OOC Plans (Will be removed when renovation is completed)

  • SK-1: Short-haul; late 30's // DC-2/3
  • SK-2: Medium-haul; mid-40's // DC-4/6
  • SK-3: Long-haul; jet; early 60's // DC-8
  • SK-4: Short- to medium-haul; late 60's // DC-9
  • SK-5: Long-haul; rep. SK-3; mid-70's // DC-10, MD-11
  • SK-6: Long-haul; rep. SK-5; mid-80's // B767
  • SK-7: Short to medium-haul; rep. SK-4; early 90's // A320
  • SK-8: Long-haul; rep. SK-6; mid-2010's // B787

Important Distances (KM, from Arkhavn)

  • 2000: Saipuo
  • 2000: Selayar via Saipuo, longest leg
  • 2300: Protiva via Saipuo, longest leg
  • 2400: SSI, Aulon (LF)
  • 3000: Protiva
  • 3100: Miyako
  • 3300: Intreimor via Protiva, longest leg
  • 3700: Selayar
  • 5100: Dartha
  • 5600: Maurotopia
  • 6100: Intreimor
  • 6500: Curia via Intreimor, longest leg
  • 7300: Limone
  • 8800: Meda
  • 9300: Girk, Ferrefaaierhafen
  • 9300: Bromwich via Ferrefaaierhafen, longest leg
  • 9500: Bogd Gioro
  • 9500: Novumcastrum via Limone, longest leg
  • 9600: New Halsham, Moskovo
  • 9800: O'polis
  • 11700: Bromwich via Dartha, longest leg
  • 12400: Curia
  • 13000: Miiros
  • 13900: Tagmatika
  • 14000: Novumcastrum
  • 16700: Bromwich

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SPECIFICATIONS (SK-2)

  • Crew: 
  • Passenger Capacity: 
  • Length: 
  • Wingspan: 
  • Height: 
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Cruise Speed: 
  • Maximum Speed: 
  • Range: 
  • Service Ceiling: 

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The SK-3 is the third jet-powered airliner to enter service. It was a major financial success and served as the backbone of Andallan aviation for most of its period. Development for the first Andallan jet airliner began in January of 1948, as Andalla was just recovering from the Thalassan War. In 1949, Skandinavisk acquired rival Saeb Aeronautik's share in the development of the Saeb K.9 under the Joint Andallan Jet Fighter Project (Forenet Andska Stridsplansprojekt or FAS). At the time, Skandinavisk and Alminn-Trisk had only begun working on a jet engine, the Alminn-Trisk J10, with Skandinavisk holding a 31.4% share in the project. With the newly-acquired technology from the Saeb RM1 turbojet that powered the K.9, development of the SK-3 was hastened in an effort to precede Aérospatiale Lysienne in its development of the Comète. However, the Comète was completed ahead of schedule and introduced with Air France in 1952, becoming the first jet airliner to enter service. The Comète saw great success internationally until October and December 1953, when 2 Air France Comètes broke up and exploded mid-air. The incidents were widely publicized, forcing Air France to ground its remaining fleet of 6 Comètes at that time. Two more similar incidents in January and April 1954 prompted most airlines operating the Comète to cease all operations of the type. Lessons learned from the ensuing investigations, widely considered to be the most in-depth investigations in aviation, allowed Skandinavisk to update its prototype to meet safety standards.

The SK-3-10 entered service with Andallan Airways in February 1961, months after the @Sunset Sea Islandsian [AIRCRAFT MODEL], becoming the third jet airliner to enter service. The SK-3 Series 10 or SK-3-10 was powered by 4 Alminn-Trisk J10 turbojets, the very first Andallan commercial jet engines.

In 1964, the SK-3 Series 20 Transoriental began production. With reduced fuel consumption compared to the Series 100, increased capacity to 189 in full-economy, and a range of nearly 11,000 kilometers, the SK-3-20 was widely considered to be one of the most advanced airliners upon release. It was developed in conjunction with the Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofan, which offered higher thrust and less fuel burn than the J10. The Series 20 became the first aircraft to cross the Oriental Ocean non-stop on a regularly-scheduled commercial flight, the first of which was Andska Luftfartsselskab (Now Andska Luftlinje, or Andallan Airways) Flight 1 from Arkhavn to O'polis, @Orioni, on 3 May 1964. Aside from transoriental crossings, the SK-3-20 also allowed direct flights to most destinations in Central Argis and Northeast Alharu. Further destinations were made accessible with only a single stopover via either Orioni or @Variota. The SK-3-20 was the most numerous variant of the SK-3, remaining in production from 1964 until the termination of the SK-3 production line in 1976.

The Series 20 Advanced followed in 1970, with newer Alminn-Trisk J24 engines. It featured a higher MTOW and further increased fuel efficiency. The SK-3-20Adv also had a slightly lower range of 9,800 km, yet was still able to reach Orioni and most parts of Central Argis.

In 1980, amid growing noise restrictions and deteriorating quality, @Gallambrian engine manufacturer Collins Aerospace came to Skandinavisk with a proposal to re-engine the Series 20 Advanced with the far quieter and more efficient Collins CEM56. As a result, the SK-3 Super 40 series was developed, though only conversions were accepted. The Super 400 boasted a less noise, less fuel consumption, and a slightly longer range than the SK-3-20Adv.

The SK-3 became one of the world's most well-known aircraft for decades, until more modern long-haul aircraft such as the SK-5 succeeded it. Skandinavisk built 174 aircraft throughout its 17-year production run, and converted 42 aircraft to the Super 40 series.

VARIANTS

  • SK-3 Series 10 (1960 - 1967): Original variant, first Andallan commercial jet aircraft.
    • SK-3-11 (Alminn-Trisk J10)
    • SK-3-12 (Alminn-Trisk J12): Increased MTOW.
  • SK-3 Series 20 Transoriental (1964 - 1976): Increased-capacity long-range variant, featuring newer Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans. The SK-3-200 was the first aircraft to fly scheduled non-stop flights across the Oriental Ocean.
    • SK-3-21 (Alminn-Trisk J20)
  • SK-3 Series 20 Freighter (1967 - 1976)
  • SK-3 Series 20 Advanced (1970 - 1974): Increased MTOW, fitted with newer J24 turbofans allowing for more economical fuel burn.
  • SK-3 Super 40 (1986 - 1989): Collins CEM56 engine conversion program for the SK-3-200Adv, allowing a slightly longer range and even lesser fuel consumption.

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-11)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 177
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 273,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J10 turbojets
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 921 km/h
  • Range: 6,900 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-12)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 177
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 276,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J12 turbojets
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 7,300 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20 Transoriental)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 315,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 8,700 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20F)

  • Crew: 5 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 264m³ (88,000 lbs)
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 315,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 6,250 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20 Advanced)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 45.7m³
  • Length: 47.9 m
  • Wingspan: 45.2 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 350,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J24 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 9,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-40)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 45.7m³
  • Length: 47.9 m
  • Wingspan: 45.2 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 350,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Collins CEM56 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 9,800 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

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The SK-4 is a short-haul narrow-body airliner. Skandinavisk's first short-haul jet airliner, the SK-4 was conceptualized in 1958 as a smaller alternative to the company's bestselling SK-3. Development studies commenced in November 1961, with its first flight taking place on 25 May 1966 and production commencing in February of the next year.  The type entered service with LuftAndska in July 1967, flying to primarily domestic routes. 22 Series 10 aircraft were delivered throughout its 4-year production run, until it was succeeded by the SK-4-20.

The SK-4-20 entered service in December 1971 with the now-defunct Braenne International Airways; its increased range and higher capacity allowed it to serve emerging destinations such as the @Sunset Sea Islands@Kipan and @Cashar from Arkhavn. The SK-4-20 was the most numerous variant produced, with 85 aircraft built from 1971 to 1985. The Series 20 was built in both passenger and cargo variants; 2 convertible variants were also produced, the -20LF for parcel or "light" freight, and the -20CF which featured a reinforced floor for cargo pallets. A unique feature of the convertible variants was their ability to be converted completely or partially, with varying cargo or passenger capacities. These variants quickly became popular among small airlines and lesser-developed countries. A dedicated freighter variant, the SK-4 Series 20 Freighter or SK-4-20AF (AF meaning "All Freighter"), was also introduced to complement the SK-3-20F on domestic operations, albeit only to minimal success. However, most of the 29 SK-4 freighters built continued service into the late 2000s, with the largest current operator being Xintou Air Cargo with 3 aircraft at 44.8, 41.3 and 37.5 years old, respectively.

In 1974, the SK-4 Series 20 International or SK-4-20i began production, entering service with Ygros Air based in Limone, @Limonaia. The Series 20i traded payload for range, with two extra fuel tanks in the front and rear of the aircraft. A total of 33 aircraft were built, while 12 Series 20 aircraft were converted to the Series 20i. The Series 20i was complemented by the SK-4-30, which was intended for domestic operations with a range of 1,950 km; 31 aircraft were built.

In 1979, the Series 40 entered service with Khai Thalassan Airways (Now KAir). The Series 40 featured a 4-meter stretch, increasing the maximum passenger capacity to 139. The SK-4-40 was produced from 1979 to 1987, with 50 aircraft built.

In 1985, the SK-4-800 Next Generation began production. The longest and final variant of the SK-4 family, the SK-4 boasted a greatly improved capacity of up to 172 passengers. With its newer, more-efficient J3X engines, the SK-4-800 was able to achieve a range of 2,600 kilometers at maximum capacity. Orders for the SK-4-800 came quickly, with 79 aircraft built across 11 years. The SK-4 series was scheduled to terminate in 1992 with the introduction of the SK-6; however, numerous unfilled orders for the fast-selling SK-4-800 prompted Skandinavisk to extend the end of production to 1996.

Following the development of the Alminn-Trisk J3X, Skandinavisk commenced a re-engine program for the Series 20 and Series 40 aircraft to provide a smaller alternative to the SK-4-800. This was known as the SK-4 "X" series, offered from 1987 to the end of the SK-4 production line. The SK-4-20X quickly became popular with smaller and emerging airlines, combining the fuel efficiency of the SK-4-800 with the smaller size and shorter takeoff distance of the SK-4-20. The Series 20X outsold its larger counterpart by a significant margin, with 55 aircraft built against the 29 Series 40X aircraft. As a result, Skandinavisk stopped producing the SK-4-40X in 1992.

The quintessential development on the best-selling SK-4 series came with the SK-4-800ER. With its more powerful J3X-3 engines, it was able to achieve a range of 3,760 kilometers at maximum capacity. Production commenced in December 1989, entering service with Andallan Airways in May 1990.

Production lasted until 1996 and spanned 29 years, with 491 aircraft built. The SK-4 was succeeded by the SK-6, which was developed and produced in conjunction with Khiimori Aeronautics and the Aishkuraend Rheilhhu Rihana.

VARIANTS

  • SK-4 Series 10 (1967 - 1971): Original variant.
  • SK-4 Series 20 (1971 - 1985): 5-meter stretch with increased range.
    • SK-4-20CF: Convertible freighter for palletized freight, with reinforced floor.
    • SK-4-20LF: Convertible freighter for parcel freight or air mail; LF meaning "light freighter".
  • SK-4 Series 20 Freighter (1972 - 1986): Windowless cargo variant. Also known as the SK-4-20AF (AF meaning "All Freight").
  • SK-4 Series 30 (1975 - 1985): "Domestic" short-range variant; 2-meter stretch from SK-4-20.
    • SK-4-31 (Alminn-Trisk J33)
  • SK-4 Series 20 International (1978 - 1984): Increased fuel tank capacity.
  • SK-4 Series 40 (1979 - 1987): 4-meter stretch from the SK-4-20.
  • SK-4-800 Next Generation (1985 - 1995): 4-meter stretch from SK-4-40, longest and final variant. Newly-developed Alminn-Trisk J3X engines allowed for higher range and MTOW.
  • SK-4 Series 40X (1987 - 1992): Increased fuel efficiency allowing for higher cargo capacity/exit limit, with Alminn-Trisk J3X engines.
  • SK-4 Series 20X (1987 - 1995): Increased fuel efficiency allowing for higher cargo capacity/exit limit, with Alminn-Trisk J3X engines.
  • SK-4-800ER (1989 - 1995): Increased range variant of the SK-4-800, using more powerful J3X-3 engines.

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-10)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 90
  • Exit Limit: 109
  • Cargo Capacity: 17.1m³
  • Length: 31.82 m
  • Wingspan: 27.25 m
  • Height: 8.4 m
  • MTOW: 90,700 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J30 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,050 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 115
  • Exit Limit: 127
  • Cargo Capacity: 25.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 108,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J32 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20i)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 105
  • Exit Limit: 117
  • Cargo Capacity: 21.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 104,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J33 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,240 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20X)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 110
  • Exit Limit: 122
  • Cargo Capacity: 23.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 106,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,480 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20F)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Cargo Capacity: 119.1m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 108,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J32 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 1,200 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-30)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 125
  • Exit Limit: 128
  • Cargo Capacity: 28.9m³
  • Length: 38.28 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.7 m
  • MTOW: 114,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J33 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 1,950 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-30X)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 133
  • Exit Limit: 138
  • Cargo Capacity: 30.6m³
  • Length: 38.28 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.7 m
  • MTOW: 115,500 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,080 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-40)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 135
  • Exit Limit: 139
  • Cargo Capacity: 33.2m³
  • Length: 40.72 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.8 m
  • MTOW: 121,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-40Adv)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 140
  • Exit Limit: 144
  • Cargo Capacity: 34.7m³
  • Length: 41.57 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.8 m
  • MTOW: 130,500 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J3X turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,440 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

1385952-large.jpg

The SK-5 is a long-range, wide-body tri-jet airliner. Skandinavisk's first wide-body airliner, the tri-jet SK-5 was intended to replace the quad-jet SK-3 and was one of the world's most advanced airliners at the time of its entry into service. The aircraft was hailed as a "national symbol" of Andalla, with public interest reaching a record high during its rollout and introduction in 1970. During development, however, the SK-5 saw fierce competition with the @Iverican-made Suisa S-1011 Trestell; both aircraft received numerous orders prior to release, though the SK-5 led by a sizable margin. While the S-1011 had a higher capacity and was unmistakably faster, safer, and more advanced, the SK-5's longer range, cheaper price and significantly lower operational costs outweighed the S-1011's advantages.

The SK-5-100 began production in January 1970, nearly 2 months earlier than its competitor. This proved a major advantage for the company as several airlines were therefore prompted to switch to the SK-5 and cancel their S-1011 orders. However, within the first few months of service, multiple structural defects caused a number of minor accidents with the aircraft; most involved malfunctions with pressurization, airtight locks, and hydraulic systems. Because of this, some airlines began to re-consider ordering the S-1011, and many unfilled orders were either cancelled or placed on hold.

Public opinion on the SK-5 was ultimately damaged by the crash of Khai Thalassan Airways (Now KAir, pronounced "Khai Air") Flight 28 on the evening of 3 March 1971, shortly after takeoff from Saipuo Toheng International Airport. As the SK-5 climbed past 12,250 feet, the improperly-secured aft cargo door blew off the aircraft due to the significant difference in air pressure. The resulting explosive decompression and rapid de-pressurization at the rear of the cargo hold caused a large section of the cabin floor to collapse also due to differences in air pressure, severing all control cables that ran through that section of the floor and sending 3 passengers immediately to their deaths as they were ejected from the aircraft. The resulting loss of control of the aircraft's rudder, elevators and aft engine due to the severing of the control cables caused it to immediately begin a sharp descent. Captain Lok Siau-Khia managed to level off the aircraft seconds before it crashed into a forest 34 kilometers north-east of Saipuo, killing him and 277 others, including the rest of the cockpit crew. Total number of deaths by the time of the crash was 280, with an additional 12 dying shortly after the crash due to extreme pain or loss of blood, leaving 39 total survivors from the original 331 aboard. Flight 28 remains the deadliest aviation disaster in Giokton or Andallan history.

Shortly after the crash, on 9 March the Andallan Aviation Authority (AAA) revoked the SK-5's type certificate and grounded all Andallan-operated aircraft of the type. Although the incident itself had been identified as primarily human error, it pointed out another major structural defect of the SK-5. Later investigations revealed that a similar incident had occurred on a test aircraft 2 years before; however, this issue was left unaddressed, presumably since Skandinavisk was attempting to beat Suisa to the aircraft's introduction. Airport congestion grew to a record high, with thousands of worried passengers cancelling their SK-5 flights. Sales of the SK-5 continued to fall sharply; at this time nearly half of the final remaining orders were cancelled. The largest blow to the SK-5's sales came when flag carrier Andallan Airways announced the cancellation and replacement of all its remaining SK-5 orders with the Iverican S-1011.

The SK-5's type certificate was restored 9 weeks later following minor modifications to the airframe and hydraulics, and an overhaul of the cargo door systems, among others. By then, most SK-5 operators had switched or begun switching to the S-1011, unable to operate their SK-5 fleets for 9 weeks since the revoking of its type certificate. Production of the SK-5 was halted in November of 1971, after having delivered only 8 more orders since the modifications. A more updated variant, the SK-5-200, entered service in 1972 and saw minimal success during release. However, Skandinavisk was convinced of its potential, and a freighter variant was created as well. Contrary to public opinion of the SK-5, the -200F variant quickly became popular with cargo airlines as a result of their long range, low operational costs, and large payload capacity.

An unprecedented catalyst in regaining the aircraft's reputation later on was the crash-landing of LuftAndska Flight 254 in Altaria, @Iverica on July 19, 1975. The aircraft, an SK-5-200 registered A-LDGO, was operating a scheduled flight between Sant Bastién and Arkhavn with 244 passengers and 14 crew. The flight deck consisted of Captain Bendt Kristoffersen, First Officer Benito Sant-Jose and Second Officer Marcus Daugaard, each having accumulated 9,000, 2,800 and 50 hours on the SK-5 respectively.

37 minutes after takeoff, as the aircraft was cruising at 37,000 ft, the tail-mounted Engine No.2 suffered an uncontained failure. The subsequent explosion damaged the horizontal stabilizer and punctured all 3 hydraulic systems in the aircraft, rendering most control surfaces inoperative. As a result of the blast, the rudder was locked in the right position, causing the aircraft to slowly yaw left. First Officer Sant-Jose immediately noticed the incorrect heading and attempted to correct it, not knowing that all control surfaces were inoperative. Captain Kristoffersen then ordered full right aileron and rudder, but the aircraft did not move. Soon enough, the aircraft entered into a phugoid cycle, wherein the aircraft would slowly pitch up then down - a phenomenon common to aircraft that had lost all control. This led Second Officer Daugaard to conclude that the aircraft's control surfaces were inoperable, and that the crew had to use differential thrust to correct the heading. At this point, ATC had already given vectors for diversion to Altaria International Airport. Using differential thrust on the two remaining engines, the flight crew began descent into Altaria.

As the aircraft began its initial approach, it was discovered that the flaps were also inoperable. Second Officer Daugaard asked a flight attendant to look out the window as he extended the spoilers, but the flight attendant returned, having seen nothing change. This meant that the aircraft would have to land at a dangerously high speed, while having no way to slow down except reverse thrust and friction. However, the SK-5-200 was installed with an emergency mechanism that allowed the landing gear to be lowered and locked into position through gravity; this system also unlocked the outboard ailerons as they were usually kept locked neutral during high-speed flight. First Officer Sant-Jose immediately made the required corrections to the aircraft's bank angle, knowing that the remaining hydraulic fluid in the ailerons could be used up soon.Due to the loss of flaps, the crew was forced to rely on engine thrust to create lift and control sink rate. On final approach, the aircraft indicated 220 knots (400 km/h) compared to the safe level of 140 knots (260 km/h). The aircraft continued yawing to the left, which proved a challenge as the crew also had to use differential thrust like a rudder. The yawing eventually stopped just two nautical miles away from the runway, and the crew was able to focus on controlling the sink rate. The aircraft was already banking slightly right, but the crew could not correct it as all the hydraulic fluid in the ailerons had been drained. Lining up for the runway became increasingly difficult as the aircraft drew closer; the crew was forced to make a series of circles to properly align the aircraft. Suddenly, at 200 feet above the ground, the aircraft began to yaw left again. This went unnoticed until the aircraft was at 50 feet; Captain Kristoffersen then applied TOGA power to the No.3 engine until the bank was corrected. At 10 feet, the aircraft started to bank left, but it was too late to correct it. As soon as the aircraft landed, the ground scraped against the No.1 engine, which began to leak fuel that soon ignited into a violent fire. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed, triggering further explosions as the rest of the No.1 engine violently hit the ground. The fuselage around the main gear began to crack, eventually splitting from the extreme heat and pressure. The aircraft was damaged far beyond repair, while the runway had to be partially rebuilt. The impact and resulting explosions killed nearly half of the aircraft's 244 passengers. Despite this, more than 140 passengers miraculously survived the crash, albeit many injured. The accident was praised as an excellent example of crew resource management, while the SK-5 received attention to its emergency mechanisms. Many media outlets dubbed the crash of Flight 254 as the "Miracle Crash". Following investigations, it was also revealed that the crash was caused by an engine maintenance issue at LuftAndska, not a manufacturer defect. During interviews, the crew of Flight 254 praised the aircraft's excellent handling; in one interview, Captain Kristoffersen said that "the plane would've otherwise crashed had it not been an SK-5". The effects were quickly seen as public opinion on the aircraft rose and airlines were once again convinced to switch their orders to the inexpensive SK-5. It was also around this time that the SK-5 series was re-branded, with model designators now using the "-XXXformat rather than the former "Series XXformat.

Soon after, in 1977, Skandinavisk announced the SK-5-300. The new variant, dubbed the "Globeliner", featured a higher MTOW and fuel capacity, and newer, more efficient Alminn-Trisk J44 engines, for a total range of 10,100 kilometers. The SK-5-300 sold very well, having accumulated nearly 50 orders at rollout. In 1979, the SK-5-300ER entered service with Ahranaian Airlines, featuring an higher MTOW and extended range to over.

This success proved useful in the further development of the SK-5, which once again became Skandinavisk's workhorse in the long-haul market. Though wide-body twinjets were already showing much potential and receiving many orders, the SK-5 remained nearly undisputed in range and passenger capacity. In 1987, amid diminishing sales of the renowned trijet, the SK-5 Next Generation was announced, consisting of the SK-5-800 and -900. The SK-5NG featured a 7-meter stretch, newer avionics, a two-pilot glass cockpit and longer range. A center-positioned main gear bogey was also added to compensate for the extra weight. The SK-5-800 entered service in 1992, while the -900 entered service in [YEAR] and continued production until the SK-5 was replaced by the SK-7-300. As of 2018, 18 of the type are still in passenger service, with many more serving with cargo airlines. The SK-5's role at the forefront of the high-capacity long-haul market was eventually replaced with the 

In 1988, the SK-5-300 freighter was modified to transport parts for the KAS SK-6, known as the SK-5 "Dreamhauler". 3 aircraft were built, one serving @Fulgistan @Rihan, and @Gallambria. For the aircraft serving Gallambria, the lower cargo hold was replaced completely by fuel tanks, allowing the aircraft to safely cross the Adlantic Ocean to Fulgistan despite carrying a full load of Collins CEM56 engines. The role of these 3 aircraft were replaced by the similarly-modified SK-5

The SK-5 series culminated with the SK-5-400, which entered service in 1989. Its production line finally ended in May 2006 with the SK-5-400F, having lasted 36 years; the longest production run of any Skandinavisk jet aircraft.

VARIANTS

  • SK-5-100 (1970 - 1971)
  • SK-5-200 (1974 - 1984)
  • SK-5-200F (1977 - 1995)
  • SK-5-300 (1976 - 1987)
  • SK-5-300ER (1977 - 1990)
  • SK-5-500Adv (1989 - 2003)
  • SK-5-500F (1992 - 2006)

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-100)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 6,116 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-200)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 7,356 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-200F)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 22 x LD7 pallets
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 7,356 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-300)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 50.46 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 9,254 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-300ER)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 50.46 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 10,622 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-400)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 410 (high-density), 373 (1-class), 323 (2-class), 293 (3-class)
  • Cargo Capacity: 32 x LD3 (lower)
  • Length: 61.62 m
  • Wingspan: 51.66 m
  • Height: 17.61 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 945 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 876 km/h
  • Range: 12,670 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-400F)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 26 x LD7 (main), 32 x LD3 (lower)
  • Length: 61.62 m
  • Wingspan: 51.66 m
  • Height: 17.61 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 945 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 876 km/h
  • Range: 7,320 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

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VARIANTS

  • SK-6-100 (1982 - 1993)
  • SK-6-100ER (1984 - 1995)
  • SK-6-200 (1986 - 2006)
  • SK-6-200ER (1990 - 2005)
  • SK-6-200XR (1997 - 2006)
  • SK-6-300 (1995 - 2005)
  • SK-6-300ER (2001 - 2007)

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-100)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 172 (high-density), 155 (1-class), 143 (2-class)
  • Length: 45.01 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.02 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 4,346 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-100ER)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 139 (high-density), 130 (1-class), 117 (2-class)
  • Length: 39.73 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.25 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 5,195 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-200)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 172 (high-density), 155 (1-class), 143 (2-class)
  • Length: 45.01 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.02 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 4,346 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft
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D-SERIES


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The D-45 is a long-range business jet, and Skandinavisk's. Most aircraft are operated privately, with some in military service as VIP transport. It is popular with large charter airlines because of its capability to cross the Oriental Ocean, but has also been used by premium regional airlines. The aircraft is designated as the C-36 in the Andallan Commonwealth Air Force.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Capacity: 14-19 passengers, 24 in high-density configuration
  • Length: 29.4 m
  • Wingspan: 28.51 m
  • Height: 7.9 m
  • Cruise Speed: 852 km/h
  • Top Speed: 936 km/h
  • Range: 12,620 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000ft
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J-SERIES


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The J-1 Meteorit is a subsonic, single-seat jet fighter. Initially developed by the ACAAC and Saeb Aeronautik under the Joint Andallan Jet Fighter Project (Forenet Andska Stridsplanprojekt) as the Saeb K.9 to become the first Andallan-made jet aircraft, Saeb's share in the project was acquired by Skandinavisk in 1949 following the post-war arms manufacturing crash. At the time, the civil aviation industry was booming and Skandinavisk was only planning to enter the military aviation industry. After 9 years of development, the first fully-operational variant began production in 1951 as the Skandinavisk J-1 Meteorit. Though largely unsuccessful due to numerous factors including low endurance, faulty airframe, unremarkable performance and low demand, the Meteorit proved an important step in the development of Andallan jet aircraft. The Meteorit remained in scarce production until the introduction of the J-2 Komet in 1958.

VARIANTS

  • J-1 Meteorit (1951 - 1958)
  • I-1 Øgle (1952 - 1970)

SPECIFICATIONS (J-1)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Length: 13.59 m
  • Wingspan: 11.32 m
  • Height: 3.96 m
  • Top Speed: 957 km/h
  • Range: 915 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-1)

  • Guns: 4 x 20mm autocannons
  • Rockets: Up to 16 x 76 mm or 8 x 127 mm air-to-ground rockets
  • Bombs: 2 x 1,000 lb bombs

1559702-large.jpg

The J-2 Komet is a transonic delta-wing interceptor fighter, and the first Andallan-made aircraft of its type. A J-2 Komet with serial number 58-023, nicknamed the "Mighty Skjellerup" (after the comet 38P/Skjellerup), holds the distinction of being the very first Andallan-made aircraft to break the sound barrier, in a controlled dive on 23 February 1959. The J-2 was known for its maneuverability, owing to its unusual combination of the T-tail and delta wing design. Due to the economic crisis, the J-2 remained in low numbers of production. Two years later, in 1960, the newly-established successor to the Andallan Commonwealth Air Command, the Andallan Commonwealth Air Force, was ready to authorize mass-production of the aircraft. Production continued until 1969.

VARIANTS

  • J-2A (1958 - 1967)
  • J-2B (1964 - 1969)

SPECIFICATIONS (J-2A)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, navigator)
  • Length: 17.15 m
  • Wingspan: 15.85 m
  • Height: 4.88 m
  • Top Speed: 1,140 km/h
  • Range: 1,530 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-2A)

  • Guns: 4 x 30mm autocannons

SPECIFICATIONS (J-2B)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, navigator)
  • Length: 17.15 m
  • Wingspan: 15.85 m
  • Height: 4.88 m
  • Top Speed: 1,140 km/h
  • Range: 1,530 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-2B)

  • Guns: 4 x 30mm autocannons
  • Bombs: 4 x under-wing pylons for a total of 1,200 lbs of bombs

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The J-3 Stjernetåge is a supersonic light fighter, and the first Andallan-made purpose-built supersonic aircraft. The J-3 was developed in response to an Andallan Commonwealth Air Force requirement for a "modernized and affordable" fighter design.

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B-SERIES


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The B-1 Glød is a high-altitude, semi-stealth strategic bomber. It was initially scheduled for production in 1971, but several flaws in the design delayed the date to May of 1972. It is the ACAF's only strategic bomber aircraft. It has a built-in ECM suite to fend off against incoming missiles. The Glød's airframe served as the basis for the more advanced @Prymont F-F Cockroach bomber.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 5 (pilot, co-pilot, weapon systems officer, navigator, ECM officer)
  • Length: 29.59 m
  • Wingspan: 30.3 m
  • Height: 8.04 m
  • Top Speed: 1,236 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 953 km/h at 45,000 ft
  • Range: 4,392 km
  • Service Ceiling: 60,000 ft

ARMAMENT

  • 21 x 1,000 lb conventional bombs
  • 42 x 500 lb conventional bombs
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I-SERIES


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The I-4 Fremstød is a transonic advanced jet trainer. However, it can also serve as a lightly-armed combat aircraft. It was introduced in 1992 and remains in production.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot/instructor)
  • Length: 13.08 m
  • Wingspan: 9.94 m
  • Height: 4.6 m
  • Top Speed: 1,036 km/h
  • Range: 1,588 km

ARMAMENT

  • Hardpoints: 2 x air-to-air/air-to-ground missiles or external drop tanks
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N-SERIES


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The N-1 Leverantör is a turboprop military transport aircraft and the first dedicated military transport aircraft developed by Skandinavisk. It entered production in 1958 and ended 1974. Only few remain in military service while a number of aircraft are privately-operated.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, radio operator/navigator)
  • Capacity: 60 troops or 24,000 lb payload
  • Length: 23.25 m
  • Wingspan: 33.53 m
  • Height: 10.39 m
  • Top Speed: 367 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 278 km/h
  • Range: 1,654 km

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The N-2 Stjärnlyft is Skandinavisk's only strategic airlifter. It is also the largest Andallan military aircraft ever produced. Production began in 1968 and ended 2001, with a second variant still in production. It has been in service with the ACAF for nearly 5 decades. One aircraft known as the White Dwarf holds the distinct record of being the longest-serving aircraft in the ACAF, beginning service in 1977.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 5-7 (pilot, co-pilot, 2 flight engineers, loadmaster, optional: second loadmaster, navigator)
  • Capacity: 154 troops, 123 paratroopers or 50,000 lb payload
  • Length: 51.3 m
  • Wingspan: 48.8 m
  • Height: 12.00 m
  • Top Speed: 912 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 790 km/h
  • Range: 4,723 km

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The N-3 Reise is a turboprop tactical airlift transport. It is the ACAF's primary tactical airlift transport and has been in service since its introduction in 1973. While the original variant ended production in 1996, newer variants are still being built. The N-3 Reise production line is expected to last until 2030, then it will be replaced by an entirely new aircraft.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, loadmaster)
  • Capacity: 93 troops, 88 paratroopers or 35,275 lb payload
  • Length: 32.40 m
  • Wingspan: 40.03 m
  • Height: 11.65 m
  • Top Speed: 513 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 495 km/h
  • Range: 1,853 km

Lithuanian_Air_Force_Antonov_AN-26_(04).

The N-4 Løfteren is a twin-engine turboprop transport and electronic warfare aircraft. It began production in 1972 and ended 2001. The N-4 also has an electronic warfare (EW) variant, the E-1 Förundras. Though officially classified as a combat aircraft, it is built along the N-4 production line.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, radio operator/navigator)
  • Capacity: 36 troops, 34 paratroopers or 12,100 lb payload
  • Length: 23.8 m
  • Wingspan: 29.3 m
  • Height: 8.58 m
  • Cruise Speed: 440 km/h
  • Range: 953 km

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The N-5 Odysse is a twin-engine turboprop tactical airlift aircraft. It was developed alongside a civilian variant, the NT-9 Iliaden, and was introduced in late 1998. It has twice the capacity of the N-4 while also boasting the new Flygmotor JR-910 turboprops, making it even faster than the N-3 Reise.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Capacity: 71 troops, 64 paratroopers or 20,600 lb payload
  • Length: 24.5 m
  • Wingspan: 25.8 m
  • Height: 8.61 m
  • Top Speed: 576 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 480 km/h
  • Range: 1,350 km on full payload
  • Service Ceiling: 30,000 ft
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    • By Andalla
      List of Diplomatic Missions
      Adaptus
      Honorary Consulate of Andalla in Novumcastrum
      Afropa
      Embassy of Andalla in Dieudonné
      Ahrana
      Embassy of Andalla in Moskovo
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Peterburi
      Astriedan
      Honorary Consulate of Andalla in Curia
      Cashar
      Embassy of Andalla in Protiva
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Malmega
      Cristina
      Embassy of Andalla in Cristina
      Fjallshima
      Embassy of Andalla in Yokoholm
      Fulgistan
      Embassy of Andalla in Bogd Gioro
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Wulumqi
      Gallambria
      Embassy of Andalla in Bromwich
      Giokto
      Embassy of Andalla in Saipuo
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Chiongto
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Kaohen
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Samto
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Yasiu
      Consulate of Andalla in Liangsiu
      Consulate of Andalla in Tailam
      Girkmand
      Embassy of Andalla in Girk
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Goodwill
      Iverica
      Embassy of Andalla in Intreimor
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Manille
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Porto Altaria
      Consulate of Andalla in Subíc
      Consulate of Andalla in Toledo
      Limonaia
      Embassy of Andalla in Limone
      Little Flau
      Embassy of Andalla in Aulon
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Fush
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Phika
      Lysian Republic
      Embassy of Andalla in Lyrie
      Magnaeus
      Honorary Consulate of Andalla in Venège
      Mauridiviah
      Embassy of Andalla in Maurotopia
      Orioni
      Embassy of Andalla in O'polis
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Meda
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Nordhaven
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Zuidhaven
      Consulate of Andalla in Vega
      Oyus
      Embassy of Andalla in Yulaa
      Prymont
      Embassy of Andalla in New Halsham
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Canastota
      Rohini
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Vali
      Sanctum Imperium Catholicum
      Embassy of Andalla in Deopolis
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Trinity
      Selayar
      Embassy of Andalla in Wanavera'a
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Mawura
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Ratnapura
      Seylos
      Embassy of Andalla in Selbourne
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Norfolk
      Sunset Sea Islands
      Embassy of Andalla in Sunset City
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Asimov
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Esperanza
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Porto Libertad
      Tagmatium
      Embassy of Andalla in Tagmatika
      Variota
      Embassy of Andalla in Ferrefaaierhafen
      Consulate-General of Andalla in Grootwaterflakte
      Other Diplomatic Missions
      Permanent Mission of Andalla to ATARA in Porto Altaria
       

      The Commonwealth of Andalla
      Ministry of Foreign Affairs
      Ministry of Foreign Affairs
      3230 Rohås Boulevard, Eremitås
      Arkhavn 10050
      ☎ Call us
      (02) 2149 3200
      (02) 2198 3200
      Fax: (02) 2853 8914
    • By Andalla
      @Iverica @Prymont @Derthalen @Astriedan @The Eurofuhrer @Girkmand @Sunset Sea Islands @Selayar @Little Flau @Variota @Cashar @Orioni @Afropa  @Tagmatium Rules @Fleur de Lys @Cristina @Magnaeus @Gallambria (Phew, that has got to be the longest line of mentions this forum has seen!)
      Fellow mentioned test subjects comrades, allow me a few minutes.
      According to my foreign relations factbook, Andalla has retrospectively established foreign relations with your country. Do not worry, in most cases it's just a consulate in the capital, not an embassy. I'm just trying to be a friendly little hippie island guy and also to strengthen my foreign trade, as Andalla's economy is focused on exports.
      If you have any objections, kindly reply in this thread. I'm okay if you wish for foreign relations to be established in the present instead of retrospectively, but do note that would sort of mean you and I have not done much in the past. If you're friendly enough and wish to establish embassies (In most cases I'll accept), then just tell me here. Thanks!
      Lys, if you're okay with it then I am maintaining foreign relations with all your countries. Unless some of them are against you, then I won't keep them in the list.
    • By Andalla
      The Thalassan War
       
      Tiauhai Sea
      5°42'43"N 119°26'46"W

      18 November 1941
      0750 hrs
       

       
      It was a calm November morning. Gentle waves lapped against the cold, gray hull of the Giokton Type 3A-class submarine C-23; her blunt bow cutting silently and steadily through the surface of the Tiauhai Sea. A soft sea breeze blew against the cheeks of five men perched atop the bridge, nonchalantly keeping watch over the seemingly endless void of blue water that surrounded them on three sides. Behind them lay the western coast of Giokto; the faint shadow of mountains and dense forests looming in the distance. The land grew smaller and smaller until it had completely disappeared beyond the horizon.
      There was no turning back.
       
      C-23 was part of a flotilla of six submarines deployed from the naval base in Chiongto, all tasked with one single, specific objective—to eliminate any Andallan troop transport steaming east, towards Giokto. The top-secret operation was ordered by an emergency meeting of Giokto's highest military officials, only days after Giokton moles in the Andallan Commonwealth Army uncovered plans to deploy the 14,000-strong 1st Infantry Division to reinforce Liamchia—a Giokton province under Andallan control. The meeting was presided by none other than the commander-in-chief of the Giokton military—High Leader Tseng Ho-soa (曾賀山)—with State Minister Li Siong-lan (李翔蘭) present.
      Tseng was, needless to say, a crazy man. Having served as High Leader since 1931, he had abolished term limits in 1939 and was known for his cult of personality. Luckily for him, he had many cronies and supporters in all ranks of government—a result of political decay in a democratically-structured but highly-flawed administration.
       

       
      As the top-secret meeting took place, the SS Theo Antonsen steamed past the breakwaters surrounding the Ålsstrand Naval Base—the headquarters of the Andallan Commonwealth Navy. Soldiers lined the upper decks of the merchant-turned-troop transport, waving to passing fishing boats and enjoying a panoramic view of the entire Arkhavn Bay.
      "Ever seen this kind of a view before?" said a young soldier in his mid-20's, to the one beside him.
      "Many times, yes," said the other one. "I've been places. I've been to Liamchia, too, twice."
      "Oh? How is it there?"
      "Not bad. Kaohen somewhat resembles old Møllerup, if you've been up north. But that was 8 years ago, when I went there. Definitely much better by now."
      The Theo Antonsen was bound for Kaohen, a large port city on the coast of Liamchia. Aboard were 1,629 soldiers and their equipment from the 8th and 9th Infantry Battalions, as well as 683 crew. Displacing 11,000 tons and measuring 135 meters from bow to stern, she was among the largest active auxiliary vessels of the Andallan Commonwealth Navy. Built in 1929 by Albertsen Skipsverft A/S in Skager, she plied Arkhavn-Argis routes as an ocean liner before being acquired by the Navy in 1938.
       
       
      "Contact, eleven-o'clock, bearing three-two-zero. It's flying Andallan colors." 
      "Good! We've found our target. Prepare the boat for dive."
      Captain Hong Hsu-eng's order rang throughout the boat. In seconds, the bridge was cleared—Hong himself sealing the hatch shut. Officers and crew gathered around the captain as he unraveled a rolled-up sea chart on a table.
      At the same time, an operator sat at the controls of a small panel with several red and green bulbs. One by one, the red bulbs turned green as Captain Hong lifted his head towards the board and waited expectantly. This was the "hull opening indicator panel", a small board that indicated which hull openings were open or closed; the crew had to secure all openings shut before the boat could commence its dive.
      At last, the final red light turned green.
      "Full green, Captain."
      Hong nodded in acknowledgement. 
      "Bow planes, five degrees down. Begin dive."
       
      The final countdown had begun. As C-23's sail slipped below the waves, it was only a matter of minutes before her potent weapons could be unleashed.
       
      "Forward room! Ready tubes one, two, three. Depth zero-five feet."
      "One and two ready," came the voice from the telephone, which was lying on the map table as the captain made his final computations.
      "All tubes ready."
       "Aye. Ready tube one, and... fire!" 
      The faint sound of the torpedo's engine whirring to life was barely audible from the control room.
      "Tube two... fire! Tube three, standby... and, fire!"
      "Torpedoes in the water."
       
      Leaving a visible white streak along the water above them, the three torpedoes zoomed towards the Theo Antonsen at 55 knots. In seconds, a warrant officer on the bridge had spotted them.
      "Torpedoes on the starboard! Approaching fast!"
      An ear-piercing scream rang from within.
      "Haaaaaaard to port!"
      Immediately, the Theo Antonsen made a sharp, abrupt turn to the left. An old ocean liner wasn't the most maneuverable of seagoing vessels, however the sudden list was enough to catch several men off-balance. It was just enough for the first torpedo to miss the ship's bow by several meters.
      Seconds later, at exactly 0832 hrs, the second torpedo fired from the C-23 scores the first hit on the doomed vessel, detonating right off the bow and creating a sizable hole in the forward cargo hold. The cargo hold began to fill with seawater as the ensuing fires quickly licked up crates of supplies. Yet before any action could be taken, the third torpedo rips through her amidships where the bulk of the passengers' quarters were located—instantly killing anyone who happened to be in their cabins at that time. Flames continued to engulf the forward cargo hold, threatening to spread to the upper decks, as the hull continued to fill with seawater. Damage control teams are sent to quell the worsening fire in the cargo hold—the breach amidships left almost unattended—as the Theo Antonsen began to list 15 degrees to the starboard.
      At 0835 hrs, an explosion rocks the forward section of the vessel; the fires had reached the ammunition stores for the soldier's firearms. Meanwhile, the situation amidships continued to worsen as the hole enlarged due to water pressure buckling the hull. The Theo Antonsen's list slowly increased to 20 degrees, threatening to capsize the vessel.
      The call to abandon ship is made at 0838 hrs—a mere 6 minutes after first impact—as seawater slowly crept up the foremost section of the bow. The upper decks, already a chaotic mess, began to flood with men waiting for life rafts; others opting to jump off the ship instead. As a result, several crewmembers are ordered to throw as many large buoyant items into the sea as possible, in order to provide the men with something to hold on to. With a lack of buoyant items save for several pieces of light furniture, the men aboard quickly resort to chopping off doors, windows and wooden panels lining the deck.
      At 0844 hrs, a loud, eerie creaking noise resonates from below decks, as the Theo Antonnen's list increases to 30 degrees. Seconds later, a second noise is heard, followed by a large crack running up to the starboard side of the deck amidships. With the davits rendered inoperable due to the sheer number of men crowding the decks, the situation grows hopeless as the few remaining lifeboats and life rafts are thrown overboard instead, forcing the men to jump as well.
      Suddenly, at 0849 hrs, the Theo Antonsen capsizes, trapping hundreds of soldiers and crew below decks. Those on the upper decks tumble along with the ship, killing several men on the starboard side as the force of impact with the seawater slams them against the wall behind them. The vessel remained afloat for a few moments, her keel exposed, and slowly began to sink again.
      By 0853 hrs—21 minutes after first impact—the last of the Theo Antonsen fades beneath the waves, taking over 800 lives with her.
       
      Minutes before the SS Theo Antonsen capsized, the vessel's wireless telegraph operator—young 23 year-old Kjetil Frandsen—had managed to send a single, desperate distress call on the 500 kHz emergency frequency. Luckily, it was picked up by the AMS Bodalf Hjalmarsson, an Arngrim-class destroyer which was about 6 hours out.
      SOS SOS SOS SOS SOS ATQH ATQH ATQH ATQH MARINESKIP. TORPEDERET TO GANGER PA HOJ HAV. SYNKER FORT. KREVER HJELP. KOM RASK KOM RASK. OMBORD 2300 SOLDATER OG MANNSKAP PA VEI TIL LIAMTSIA. 5.42 N 119.26 W SOS SOS SOS SOS SOS AQTO (the Theo Antonsen's callsign) ATQH ATQH ATQH ATQH Navy Vessel. Torpedoed twice on the high seas. Sinking fast. Require assistance. Come quickly come quickly. Onboard 2300 soldiers and crew on the way to Liamtsia. 5.42 N 119.26 W
       
      The survivors—numbering nearly 1,400 of the initial 2,312 soldiers and crew—remained afloat in clusters of lifeboats, life rafts, and pieces of chopped-off wood. In a snap of a finger, the 3rd Infantry Regiment had lost nearly a third of its manpower.
      Early the next day, 19th November 1941, saw the Landstinget—the Andallan parliament—convene in an emergency joint session for an address by President Hakon Carlsen
       
      Thus the Thalassan War begins.
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