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Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing, officially Skandinavisk Flygproducent A/S, is an Andallan aerospace company that designs, manufactures and sells both civilian and military aircraft. Skandinavisk is the largest aerospace company in Andalla and Thalassa by revenue, employees and size. The company employs 62,773 people in Andalla and Giokto, making it the single largest employer locally. At the end of FY 2017, a total of 91,359 people were employed worldwide. Skandinavisk aircraft are delivered to customers across the world, with major final assembly plants located in Andalla, @Orioni and @Limonaia. The company's international headquarters are located in the Skandinavisk Global Tower along Antonsen Avenue in downtown Arkhavn, with regional head offices in Nordhaven (Orioni), Toledo (Iverica), Limone (Limonaia) and Feerefaaierhafen (Variota).

The company was founded on 2 September 1907 by Markus Olstad, along with the same group of engineers who built the first successful Andallan powered aircraft  the Olstad Flyer. Wilbert Vernesen, the first Andallan pilot on a powered aircraft, served as the company's chief pilot and trained several more to become the very first Andallan pilots. The first Skandinavisk-built aircraft was the Model 1, a small experimental biplane based off the Olstad Flyer. The company soon began producing general-purpose biplanes, the most popular of which were the "P-series" mailplanes. In the early 1920s, the company began to venture into larger commercial aircraft. Throughout the 1930s, focus was gradually shifted from general-purpose aircraft to the much larger airliners. Skandinavisk competed very closely with Saeb, the latter of which ventured into flying boats to address the needs of the archipelago. However, as the popularity of flying boats began to diminish, Saeb ultimately lost its foothold in the large airliner market. Meanwhile, Skandinavisk had introduced the very successful "SK-series" airliners, cementing its position at the top of the Thalassan aerospace industry. The company entered the jet age after Saeb was forced to sell its jet fighter project due to the rapidly-falling demand for military equipment after the Thalassan War. Soon later, Skandinavisk entered the commercial jet age with the classic SK-3. It was at this time that Skandinavisk began to grow rapidly, producing several more jet airliners, all of which were successful. In the early 1980s, Skandinavisk formed a joint venture with Khiimori Aeronautics of @Fulgistan and the Aishkuraend Rheilhhu Rihana of @Rihan to develop and manufacture the SK-6. The SK-6 project was only beginning design studies at that time, and the newly-formed KAS Aerospace took over development. Along with KAS Aerospace, Skandinavisk remains one of the world's largest and most prominent civil aviation manufacturers.


Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing is subdivided into 5 major divisions:

  • Skandinavisk Global, primary manufacturer of SK-series airliners; based in Finkenveder, with a second final assembly plant in Tailam, Giokto.
  • Skandinavisk Europa, manufactures general-purpose aircraft; based in Nordhaven, Orioni.
  • Skandinavisk Argis, manufacturer of SK-series airliners; based in Limone, Limonaia.
  • Skandinavisk Thalassa, manufactures general-purpose aircraft; based in Vindkilde.
  • Skandinavisk Defense, military division of Skandinavisk; based in Klarsby.
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EARLY AIRCRAFT


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The Olstad Flyer was the very first Andallan heavier-than-air powered aircraft. It was designed and built primarily by Markus Olstad and some friends, among them Wilbert Verneson who manned the first powered flight by an Andallan on the Ikaropoulos. The Flyer first flew on December 18, 1906 with Verneson at the controls, while subsequent flights were flown by other men that Verneson had trained.

Born 20 August 1875 in the small town of Skandinavien, Wilbert Verneson moved to Tagmatium in 1893 in search of a better life following the death of both his parents in a fire. After endless searching, Verneson found long-term employment with Ioannes Glauketes as a chauffeur. In January of 1903, he was among the first people to be trained on Glauketes' flying machine. Months later, Wilbert Verneson became the first Andallan and non-Europan pilot of a powered aircraft when he piloted the Ikaropoulos' 4th flight. News of the first Andallan pilot crossed the Oriental Ocean quickly, and the entire nation was captivated by the newfound technology. Verneson returned home to a hero's welcome a year later, after being paid handsomely by Glauketes. Soon after, Verneson met engineer and neighbor Markus Olstad who, with some friends, was planning to build their own flying machine. The Flyer began actual development in 1905, while Olstad had already been working on a homemade V8 engine.

The Olstad Flyer's first flight took place in the early hours of 18 December 1906, in a farm just outside Skandinavien owned by one of Olstad's friends. Contrary to the Ikaropoulos, the Flyer's first flight was witnessed by over a hundred people, including several members of the press from numerous major Andallan newspapers. The Flyer flew 72 meters (236 feet) at a height of roughly 15 meters (50 feet), becoming the first Andallan and Thalassan heavier-than-air powered flight. It was a groundbreaking success, and numerous photographs of the first flight were taken. The Flyer soon became known across the region owing to the wide publicity received by the event, which led Olstad to formally establish an aircraft company in 1907 — Skandinavisk. The company derived its name from the colloquial demonym of the town, as the Flyer project received much support from fellow town-mates during development. Over half the entire town was present at the first flight, and eventually nearly the entire population would work for Skandinavisk. Currently, Skandinavien is home to a population of nearly 30,000 people, most of which either work at the Skandinavisk Finkenveder Factory or any aviation-related business.

In the months leading up to the first flight, Verneson had trained Olstad and a number of his friends to fly the aircraft as well. Subsequent flights were flown by Verneson's recruits, while Verneson became Skandinavisk's chief pilot until his retirement in 1937.

While the Flyer was completed before the founding of Skandinavisk, it was listed under the company's assets as a test aircraft for later designs. In 1909, the Flyer was modified with a rudimentary undercarriage to allow smoother operations. The only Olstad Flyer built was retired in 1914 and remains on active display at the Skandinavisk Finkenveder Factory.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Length: 8.0 m
  • Wingspan: 13.21 m
  • Height: 2.14 m

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The Model 10 is a two-seat, single-engine general aviation aircraft. It first flew in 1947 and was the first mass-produced Skandinavisk aircraft. Production began in 1948 and an estimated 980 were built across 16 years. It was Skandinavisk's first large financial success and paved the way for the designing of the first Skandinavisk airliner, the SK-1.

VARIANTS

  • Model 10 (1948 - 1953)
  • Model 11 (1954 - 1960)
  • Model 12 (1960 - 1963)
  • L-10 (1962 - 1964)

SPECIFICATIONS (Model 10)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 1
  • Length: 6.55 m
  • Wingspan: 10.16 m
  • Height: 1.91 m
  • Cruise Speed: 171 km/h
  • Top Speed: 202 km/h
  • Range: 728 km
  • Service Ceiling: 15,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (L-10)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 1
  • Length: 6.63 m
  • Wingspan: 10.57 m
  • Height: 1.87 m
  • Cruise Speed: 193 km/h
  • Top Speed: 219 km/h
  • Range: 760 km
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 ft

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The L-20 Ravn is a four-seat, single-engine, high-wing utility aircraft, and is one of Skandinavisk's most successful aircraft. First flown in 1962, more than 7,000 aircraft have been built since then. The sheer popularity of the aircraft has earned it the nickname "lille fugl", or "little bird". Dozens of variants have been created over the years, ensuring the L-20 to be up-to-date with modern technology and capabilities despite the model itself being over 50 years old. Most L-20 aircraft are owned privately. It has also found a home with military users as border patrol aircraft or trainers, however very few are in service as such.

VARIANTS

  • L-20A (1962 - 1964)
  • L-20B (1963 - 1971)
  • L-20C (1969 - 1987)
  • L-20D (1987 - 1995)
  • L-20E (1992 - 2008)
  • L-20F (2007 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (L-20F)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 3
  • Length: 8.32 m
  • Wingspan: 11.2 m
  • Height: 2.73 m
  • Cruise Speed: 227 km/h
  • Top Speed: 306 km/h
  • Range: 1,293 km
  • Service Ceiling: 18,500 ft

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The L-30 Ørn is a six-seat, twin-engine turboprop general aviation aircraft. Skandinavisk's second most widely-produced aircraft after the L-20, it first flew in 1972 and remains in production. 2,600 aircraft have been produced as of August 2017.

VARIANTS

  • L-30A (1974 - 1978)
  • L-30B (1977 - 1989)
  • L-30C (1990 - 2002)
  • L-30D (2002 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (L-30D)

  • Crew: 1-2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 6
  • Length: 11.09 m
  • Wingspan: 12.56 m
  • Height: 3.52 m
  • Cruise Speed: 448 km/h
  • Top Speed: 481 km/h
  • Range: 2,759 km
  • Service Ceiling: 30,300 ft
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T-SERIES AIRCRAFT


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The T-1 Pionjär is a turboprop STOL transport. It was an immediate success, possessing the capability to land nearly anywhere with its low runway requirement of 900 ft.


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The T-5 Buffel is a turboprop STOL utility aircraft. Known for its durability, the F-5 is quickly aging but is still in widespread use. It first flew in 1963 and has been used by both private and military operators. Production ceased in 1992 with 317 aircraft built.The Carabao is extremely popular with small domestic airlines, specially cargo airlines. One extraordinary capability of the Carabao is being able to land and take off with a shorter runway than even the L-20, making it extremely useful in emergency situations. A newer, updated variant, the F-6, was introduced in 1989 and remains in production.

VARIANTS

  • T-5A (1966 - 1979)
  • T-5B (1977 - 1992)
  • T-6 (1989 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (T-6)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, crew chief)
  • Capacity: 48 passengers or 18,500 lb payload
  • Length: 24.08 m
  • Wingspan: 29.26 m
  • Height: 8.73 m
  • Cruise Speed: 425 km/h
  • Top Speed: 463 km/h
  • Range: 1,126 km
  • Service Ceiling: 31,400 ft

C-295M.jpg

C-295M.jpgThe T-8 Rensdyr is a short-range, twin-engine turboprop transport introduced in 1996. It can serve as a short-range airliner or a small cargo aircraft, and has continued to sell strongly to small domestic airlines.

VARIANTS

  • T-8 (1996 - present)

SPECIFICATIONS (T-8)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Capacity: 28 passengers or 5,800 lb payload
  • Length: 15.67 m
  • Wingspan: 22.06 m
  • Height: 5.05 m
  • Cruise Speed: 381 km/h
  • Top Speed: 408 km/h
  • Range: 1,763 km
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SK-SERIES AIRCRAFT


OOC Plans (Will be removed when renovation is completed)

  • SK-1: Short-haul; late 30s // DC-3
  • SK-2: Medium-haul; late 40's // DC-4
  • SK-3: Long-haul; jet; early 60's // DC-8
  • SK-4: Short- to medium-haul; late 60's // DC-9
  • SK-5: Long-haul; rep. SK-3; mid-70's // DC-10, MD-11
  • SK-6: Long-haul; mid-80's // B767
  • SK-7: Short to medium-haul; rep. SK-4; early 90's // A319/20/21
  • SK-8: RJ; late 2000's // Fokker 100
  • SK-9: Long-haul; rep. SK-5/6; mid-2010's // B787

Important Distances (KM, from Arkhavn)

  • 2000: Saipuo
  • 2000: Selayar via Saipuo, longest leg
  • 2300: Protiva via Saipuo, longest leg
  • 2400: SSI, Aulon (LF)
  • 3000: Protiva
  • 3100: Miyako
  • 3300: Intreimor via Protiva, longest leg
  • 3700: Selayar
  • 5100: Dartha
  • 5600: Maurotopia
  • 6100: Intreimor
  • 6500: Curia via Intreimor, longest leg
  • 7300: Limone
  • 8800: Meda
  • 9300: Girk, Ferrefaaierhafen
  • 9300: Bromwich via Ferrefaaierhafen, longest leg
  • 9500: Bogd Gioro
  • 9500: Novumcastrum via Limone, longest leg
  • 9600: New Halsham, Moskovo
  • 9800: O'polis
  • 11700: Bromwich via Dartha, longest leg
  • 12400: Curia
  • 13000: Miiros
  • 13900: Tagmatika
  • 14000: Novumcastrum
  • 16700: Bromwich

SEA-DC-3-PI-C861-MNL-3.10.66-AMI-BBD-lan

 


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SPECIFICATIONS (SK-2)

  • Crew: 
  • Passenger Capacity: 
  • Length: 
  • Wingspan: 
  • Height: 
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Cruise Speed: 
  • Maximum Speed: 
  • Range: 
  • Service Ceiling: 

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The SK-3 is the third jet-powered airliner to enter service. It was a major financial success and served as the backbone of Andallan aviation for most of its period. Development for the first Andallan jet airliner began in January of 1948, as Andalla was just recovering from the Thalassan War. In 1949, Skandinavisk acquired rival Saeb Aeronautik's share in the development of the Saeb K.9 under the Joint Andallan Jet Fighter Project (Forenet Andska Stridsplansprojekt or FAS). At the time, Skandinavisk and Alminn-Trisk had only begun working on a jet engine, the Alminn-Trisk J10, with Skandinavisk holding a 31.4% share in the project. With the newly-acquired technology from the Saeb RM1 turbojet that powered the K.9, development of the SK-3 was hastened in an effort to precede Aérospatiale Lysienne in its development of the Comète. However, the Comète was completed ahead of schedule and introduced with Air France in 1952, becoming the first jet airliner to enter service. The Comète saw great success internationally until October and December 1953, when 2 Air France Comètes broke up and exploded mid-air. The incidents were widely publicized, forcing Air France to ground its remaining fleet of 6 Comètes at that time. Two more similar incidents in January and April 1954 prompted most airlines operating the Comète to cease all operations of the type. Lessons learned from the ensuing investigations, widely considered to be the most in-depth investigations in aviation, allowed Skandinavisk to update its prototype to meet safety standards.

The SK-3-10 entered service with Andallan Airways in February 1961, months after the @Sunset Sea Islandsian [AIRCRAFT MODEL], becoming the third jet airliner to enter service. The SK-3 Series 10 or SK-3-10 was powered by 4 Alminn-Trisk J10 turbojets, the very first Andallan commercial jet engines.

In 1964, the SK-3 Series 20 Transoriental began production. With reduced fuel consumption compared to the Series 100, increased capacity to 189 in full-economy, and a range of nearly 11,000 kilometers, the SK-3-20 was widely considered to be one of the most advanced airliners upon release. It was developed in conjunction with the Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofan, which offered higher thrust and less fuel burn than the J10. The Series 20 became the first aircraft to cross the Oriental Ocean non-stop on a regularly-scheduled commercial flight, the first of which was Andska Luftfartsselskab (Now Andska Luftlinje, or Andallan Airways) Flight 1 from Arkhavn to O'polis, @Orioni, on 3 May 1964. Aside from transoriental crossings, the SK-3-20 also allowed direct flights to most destinations in Central Argis and Northeast Alharu. Further destinations were made accessible with only a single stopover via either Orioni or @Variota. The SK-3-20 was the most numerous variant of the SK-3, remaining in production from 1964 until the termination of the SK-3 production line in 1976.

The Series 20 Advanced followed in 1970, with newer Alminn-Trisk J24 engines. It featured a higher MTOW and further increased fuel efficiency. The SK-3-20Adv also had a slightly lower range of 9,800 km, yet was still able to reach Orioni and most parts of Central Argis.

In 1980, amid growing noise restrictions and deteriorating quality, @Gallambrian engine manufacturer Collins Aerospace came to Skandinavisk with a proposal to re-engine the Series 20 Advanced with the far quieter and more efficient Collins CEM56. As a result, the SK-3 Super 40 series was developed, though only conversions were accepted. The Super 400 boasted a less noise, less fuel consumption, and a slightly longer range than the SK-3-20Adv.

The SK-3 became one of the world's most well-known aircraft for decades, until more modern long-haul aircraft such as the SK-5 succeeded it. Skandinavisk built 174 aircraft throughout its 17-year production run, and converted 42 aircraft to the Super 40 series.

VARIANTS

  • SK-3 Series 10 (1960 - 1967): Original variant, first Andallan commercial jet aircraft.
    • SK-3-11 (Alminn-Trisk J10)
    • SK-3-12 (Alminn-Trisk J12): Increased MTOW.
  • SK-3 Series 20 Transoriental (1964 - 1976): Increased-capacity long-range variant, featuring newer Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans. The SK-3-200 was the first aircraft to fly scheduled non-stop flights across the Oriental Ocean.
    • SK-3-21 (Alminn-Trisk J20)
  • SK-3 Series 20 Freighter (1967 - 1976)
  • SK-3 Series 20 Advanced (1970 - 1974): Increased MTOW, fitted with newer J24 turbofans allowing for more economical fuel burn.
  • SK-3 Super 40 (1986 - 1989): Collins CEM56 engine conversion program for the SK-3-200Adv, allowing a slightly longer range and even lesser fuel consumption.

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-11)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 177
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 273,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J10 turbojets
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 921 km/h
  • Range: 6,900 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-12)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 177
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 276,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J12 turbojets
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 7,300 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20 Transoriental)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 39m³
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 315,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 8,700 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20F)

  • Crew: 5 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 264m³ (88,000 lbs)
  • Length: 45.9 m
  • Wingspan: 43.4 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 315,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J20 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 6,250 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-20 Advanced)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 45.7m³
  • Length: 47.9 m
  • Wingspan: 45.2 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 350,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Alminn-Trisk J24 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 9,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-3-40)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, engineer, navigator)
  • Passenger Capacity: 189
  • Cargo Capacity: 45.7m³
  • Length: 47.9 m
  • Wingspan: 45.2 m
  • Height: 12.91 m
  • MTOW: 350,000 lb
  • Engines: 4 x Collins CEM56 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 895 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 946 km/h
  • Range: 9,800 km
  • Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft

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The SK-4 is a short-haul narrow-body airliner. Skandinavisk's first short-haul jet airliner, the SK-4 was conceptualized in 1958 as a smaller alternative to the company's bestselling SK-3. Development studies commenced in November 1961, with its first flight taking place on 25 May 1966 and production commencing in February of the next year.  The type entered service with LuftAndska in July 1967, flying to primarily domestic routes. 22 Series 10 aircraft were delivered throughout its 4-year production run, until it was succeeded by the SK-4-20.

The SK-4-20 entered service in December 1971 with the now-defunct Braenne International Airways; its increased range and higher capacity allowed it to serve emerging destinations such as the @Sunset Sea Islands@Kipan and @Cashar from Arkhavn. The SK-4-20 was the most numerous variant produced, with 85 aircraft built from 1971 to 1985. The Series 20 was built in both passenger and cargo variants; 2 convertible variants were also produced, the -20LF for parcel or "light" freight, and the -20CF which featured a reinforced floor for cargo pallets. A unique feature of the convertible variants was their ability to be converted completely or partially, with varying cargo or passenger capacities. These variants quickly became popular among small airlines and lesser-developed countries. A dedicated freighter variant, the SK-4 Series 20 Freighter or SK-4-20AF (AF meaning "All Freighter"), was also introduced to complement the SK-3-20F on domestic operations, albeit only to minimal success. However, most of the 29 SK-4 freighters built continued service into the late 2000s, with the largest current operator being Xintou Air Cargo with 3 aircraft at 44.8, 41.3 and 37.5 years old, respectively.

In 1974, the SK-4 Series 20 International or SK-4-20i began production, entering service with Ygros Air based in Limone, @Limonaia. The Series 20i traded payload for range, with two extra fuel tanks in the front and rear of the aircraft. A total of 33 aircraft were built, while 12 Series 20 aircraft were converted to the Series 20i. The Series 20i was complemented by the SK-4-30, which was intended for domestic operations with a range of 1,950 km; 31 aircraft were built.

In 1979, the Series 40 entered service with Khai Thalassan Airways (Now KAir). The Series 40 featured a 4-meter stretch, increasing the maximum passenger capacity to 139. The SK-4-40 was produced from 1979 to 1987, with 50 aircraft built.

In 1985, the SK-4-800 Next Generation began production. The longest and final variant of the SK-4 family, the SK-4 boasted a greatly improved capacity of up to 172 passengers. With its newer, more-efficient J3X engines, the SK-4-800 was able to achieve a range of 2,600 kilometers at maximum capacity. Orders for the SK-4-800 came quickly, with 79 aircraft built across 11 years. The SK-4 series was scheduled to terminate in 1992 with the introduction of the SK-6; however, numerous unfilled orders for the fast-selling SK-4-800 prompted Skandinavisk to extend the end of production to 1996.

Following the development of the Alminn-Trisk J3X, Skandinavisk commenced a re-engine program for the Series 20 and Series 40 aircraft to provide a smaller alternative to the SK-4-800. This was known as the SK-4 "X" series, offered from 1987 to the end of the SK-4 production line. The SK-4-20X quickly became popular with smaller and emerging airlines, combining the fuel efficiency of the SK-4-800 with the smaller size and shorter takeoff distance of the SK-4-20. The Series 20X outsold its larger counterpart by a significant margin, with 55 aircraft built against the 29 Series 40X aircraft. As a result, Skandinavisk stopped producing the SK-4-40X in 1992.

The quintessential development on the best-selling SK-4 series came with the SK-4-800ER. With its more powerful J3X-3 engines, it was able to achieve a range of 3,760 kilometers at maximum capacity. Production commenced in December 1989, entering service with Andallan Airways in May 1990.

Production lasted until 1996 and spanned 29 years, with 491 aircraft built. The SK-4 was succeeded by the SK-6, which was developed and produced in conjunction with Khiimori Aeronautics and the Aishkuraend Rheilhhu Rihana.

VARIANTS

  • SK-4 Series 10 (1967 - 1971): Original variant.
  • SK-4 Series 20 (1971 - 1985): 5-meter stretch with increased range.
    • SK-4-20CF: Convertible freighter for palletized freight, with reinforced floor.
    • SK-4-20LF: Convertible freighter for parcel freight or air mail; LF meaning "light freighter".
  • SK-4 Series 20 Freighter (1972 - 1986): Windowless cargo variant. Also known as the SK-4-20AF (AF meaning "All Freight").
  • SK-4 Series 30 (1975 - 1985): "Domestic" short-range variant; 2-meter stretch from SK-4-20.
    • SK-4-31 (Alminn-Trisk J33)
  • SK-4 Series 20 International (1978 - 1984): Increased fuel tank capacity.
  • SK-4 Series 40 (1979 - 1987): 4-meter stretch from the SK-4-20.
  • SK-4-800 Next Generation (1985 - 1995): 4-meter stretch from SK-4-40, longest and final variant. Newly-developed Alminn-Trisk J3X engines allowed for higher range and MTOW.
  • SK-4 Series 40X (1987 - 1992): Increased fuel efficiency allowing for higher cargo capacity/exit limit, with Alminn-Trisk J3X engines.
  • SK-4 Series 20X (1987 - 1995): Increased fuel efficiency allowing for higher cargo capacity/exit limit, with Alminn-Trisk J3X engines.
  • SK-4-800ER (1989 - 1995)Increased range variant of the SK-4-800, using more powerful J3X-3 engines.

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-10)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 90
  • Exit Limit: 109
  • Cargo Capacity: 17.1m³
  • Length: 31.82 m
  • Wingspan: 27.25 m
  • Height: 8.4 m
  • MTOW: 90,700 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J30 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,050 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 115
  • Exit Limit: 127
  • Cargo Capacity: 25.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 108,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J32 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20i)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 105
  • Exit Limit: 117
  • Cargo Capacity: 21.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 104,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J33 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,240 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20X)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 110
  • Exit Limit: 122
  • Cargo Capacity: 23.3m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 106,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,480 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-20F)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Cargo Capacity: 119.1m³
  • Length: 36.36 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.5 m
  • MTOW: 108,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J32 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 1,200 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-30)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 125
  • Exit Limit: 128
  • Cargo Capacity: 28.9m³
  • Length: 38.28 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.7 m
  • MTOW: 114,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J33 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 1,950 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-30X)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 133
  • Exit Limit: 138
  • Cargo Capacity: 30.6m³
  • Length: 38.28 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.7 m
  • MTOW: 115,500 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,080 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-40)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 135
  • Exit Limit: 139
  • Cargo Capacity: 33.2m³
  • Length: 40.72 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.8 m
  • MTOW: 121,000 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J34 turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 2,650 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-4-40Adv)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 140
  • Exit Limit: 144
  • Cargo Capacity: 34.7m³
  • Length: 41.57 m
  • Wingspan: 28.44 m
  • Height: 8.8 m
  • MTOW: 130,500 lb
  • Engines: 2 x Alminn-Trisk J3X turbofans
  • Cruise Speed: 885 km/h
  • Maximum Speed: 903 km/h
  • Range: 3,440 km
  • Service Ceiling: 35,000 ft

1385952-large.jpg

The SK-5 is a long-range, wide-body tri-jet airliner. Skandinavisk's first wide-body airliner, the tri-jet SK-5 was intended to replace the quad-jet SK-3 and was one of the world's most advanced airliners at the time of its entry into service. The aircraft was hailed as a "national symbol" of Andalla, with public interest reaching a record high during its rollout and introduction in 1970. During development, however, the SK-5 saw fierce competition with the @Iverican-made Suisa S-1011 Trestell; both aircraft received numerous orders prior to release, though the SK-5 led by a sizable margin. While the S-1011 had a higher capacity and was unmistakably faster, safer, and more advanced, the SK-5's longer range, cheaper price and significantly lower operational costs outweighed the S-1011's advantages.

The SK-5-100 began production in January 1970, nearly 2 months earlier than its competitor. This proved a major advantage for the company as several airlines were therefore prompted to switch to the SK-5 and cancel their S-1011 orders. However, within the first few months of service, multiple structural defects caused a number of minor accidents with the aircraft; most involved malfunctions with pressurization, airtight locks, and hydraulic systems. Because of this, some airlines began to re-consider ordering the S-1011, and many unfilled orders were either cancelled or placed on hold.

Public opinion on the SK-5 was ultimately damaged by the crash of Khai Thalassan Airways (Now KAir, pronounced "Khai Air") Flight 28 on the evening of 3 March 1971, shortly after takeoff from Saipuo Toheng International Airport. As the SK-5 climbed past 12,250 feet, the improperly-secured aft cargo door blew off the aircraft due to the significant difference in air pressure. The resulting explosive decompression and rapid de-pressurization at the rear of the cargo hold caused a large section of the cabin floor to collapse also due to differences in air pressure, severing all control cables that ran through that section of the floor and sending 3 passengers immediately to their deaths as they were ejected from the aircraft. The resulting loss of control of the aircraft's rudder, elevators and aft engine due to the severing of the control cables caused it to immediately begin a sharp descent. Captain Lok Siau-Khia managed to level off the aircraft seconds before it crashed into a forest 34 kilometers north-east of Saipuo, killing him and 277 others, including the rest of the cockpit crew. Total number of deaths by the time of the crash was 280, with an additional 12 dying shortly after the crash due to extreme pain or loss of blood, leaving 39 total survivors from the original 331 aboard. Flight 28 remains the deadliest aviation disaster in Giokton or Andallan history.

Shortly after the crash, on 9 March the Andallan Aviation Authority (AAA) revoked the SK-5's type certificate and grounded all Andallan-operated aircraft of the type. Although the incident itself had been identified as primarily human error, it pointed out another major structural defect of the SK-5. Later investigations revealed that a similar incident had occurred on a test aircraft 2 years before; however, this issue was left unaddressed, presumably since Skandinavisk was attempting to beat Suisa to the aircraft's introduction. Airport congestion grew to a record high, with thousands of worried passengers cancelling their SK-5 flights. Sales of the SK-5 continued to fall sharply; at this time nearly half of the final remaining orders were cancelled. The largest blow to the SK-5's sales came when flag carrier Andallan Airways announced the cancellation and replacement of all its remaining SK-5 orders with the Iverican S-1011.

The SK-5's type certificate was restored 9 weeks later following minor modifications to the airframe and hydraulics, and an overhaul of the cargo door systems, among others. By then, most SK-5 operators had switched or begun switching to the S-1011, unable to operate their SK-5 fleets for 9 weeks since the revoking of its type certificate. Production of the SK-5 was halted in November of 1971, after having delivered only 8 more orders since the modifications. A more updated variant, the SK-5-200, entered service in 1972 and saw minimal success during release. However, Skandinavisk was convinced of its potential, and a freighter variant was created as well. Contrary to public opinion of the SK-5, the -200F variant quickly became popular with cargo airlines as a result of their long range, low operational costs, and large payload capacity.

An unprecedented catalyst in regaining the aircraft's reputation later on was the crash-landing of LuftAndska Flight 254 in Altaria, @Iverica on July 19, 1975. The aircraft, an SK-5-200 registered A-LDGO, was operating a scheduled flight between Sant Bastién and Arkhavn with 244 passengers and 14 crew. The flight deck consisted of Captain Bendt Kristoffersen, First Officer Benito Sant-Jose and Second Officer Marcus Daugaard, each having accumulated 9,000, 2,800 and 50 hours on the SK-5 respectively.

37 minutes after takeoff, as the aircraft was cruising at 37,000 ft, the tail-mounted Engine No.2 suffered an uncontained failure. The subsequent explosion damaged the horizontal stabilizer and punctured all 3 hydraulic systems in the aircraft, rendering most control surfaces inoperative. As a result of the blast, the rudder was locked in the right position, causing the aircraft to slowly yaw left. First Officer Sant-Jose immediately noticed the incorrect heading and attempted to correct it, not knowing that all control surfaces were inoperative. Captain Kristoffersen then ordered full right aileron and rudder, but the aircraft did not move. Soon enough, the aircraft entered into a phugoid cycle, wherein the aircraft would slowly pitch up then down - a phenomenon common to aircraft that had lost all control. This led Second Officer Daugaard to conclude that the aircraft's control surfaces were inoperable, and that the crew had to use differential thrust to correct the heading. At this point, ATC had already given vectors for diversion to Altaria International Airport. Using differential thrust on the two remaining engines, the flight crew began descent into Altaria.

As the aircraft began its initial approach, it was discovered that the flaps were also inoperable. Second Officer Daugaard asked a flight attendant to look out the window as he extended the spoilers, but the flight attendant returned, having seen nothing change. This meant that the aircraft would have to land at a dangerously high speed, while having no way to slow down except reverse thrust and friction. However, the SK-5-200 was installed with an emergency mechanism that allowed the landing gear to be lowered and locked into position through gravity; this system also unlocked the outboard ailerons as they were usually kept locked neutral during high-speed flight. First Officer Sant-Jose immediately made the required corrections to the aircraft's bank angle, knowing that the remaining hydraulic fluid in the ailerons could be used up soon.Due to the loss of flaps, the crew was forced to rely on engine thrust to create lift and control sink rate. On final approach, the aircraft indicated 220 knots (400 km/h) compared to the safe level of 140 knots (260 km/h). The aircraft continued yawing to the left, which proved a challenge as the crew also had to use differential thrust like a rudder. The yawing eventually stopped just two nautical miles away from the runway, and the crew was able to focus on controlling the sink rate. The aircraft was already banking slightly right, but the crew could not correct it as all the hydraulic fluid in the ailerons had been drained. Lining up for the runway became increasingly difficult as the aircraft drew closer; the crew was forced to make a series of circles to properly align the aircraft. Suddenly, at 200 feet above the ground, the aircraft began to yaw left again. This went unnoticed until the aircraft was at 50 feet; Captain Kristoffersen then applied TOGA power to the No.3 engine until the bank was corrected. At 10 feet, the aircraft started to bank left, but it was too late to correct it. As soon as the aircraft landed, the ground scraped against the No.1 engine, which began to leak fuel that soon ignited into a violent fire. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed, triggering further explosions as the rest of the No.1 engine violently hit the ground. The fuselage around the main gear began to crack, eventually splitting from the extreme heat and pressure. The aircraft was damaged far beyond repair, while the runway had to be partially rebuilt. The impact and resulting explosions killed nearly half of the aircraft's 244 passengers. Despite this, more than 140 passengers miraculously survived the crash, albeit many injured. The accident was praised as an excellent example of crew resource management, while the SK-5 received attention to its emergency mechanisms. Many media outlets dubbed the crash of Flight 254 as the "Miracle Crash". Following investigations, it was also revealed that the crash was caused by an engine maintenance issue at LuftAndska, not a manufacturer defect. During interviews, the crew of Flight 254 praised the aircraft's excellent handling; in one interview, Captain Kristoffersen said that "the plane would've otherwise crashed had it not been an SK-5". The effects were quickly seen as public opinion on the aircraft rose and airlines were once again convinced to switch their orders to the inexpensive SK-5. It was also around this time that the SK-5 series was re-branded, with model designators now using the "-XXXformat rather than the former "Series XXformat.

Soon after, in 1977, Skandinavisk announced the SK-5-300. The new variant, dubbed the "Globeliner", featured a higher MTOW and fuel capacity, and newer, more efficient Alminn-Trisk J44 engines, for a total range of 10,100 kilometers. The SK-5-300 sold very well, having accumulated nearly 50 orders at rollout. In 1979, the SK-5-300ER entered service with Ahranaian Airlines, featuring an higher MTOW and extended range to over.

This success proved useful in the further development of the SK-5, which once again became Skandinavisk's workhorse in the long-haul market. Though wide-body twinjets were already showing much potential and receiving many orders, the SK-5 remained nearly undisputed in range and passenger capacity. In 1987, amid diminishing sales of the renowned trijet, the SK-5 Next Generation was announced, consisting of the SK-5-800 and -900. The SK-5NG featured a 7-meter stretch, newer avionics, a two-pilot glass cockpit and longer range. A center-positioned main gear bogey was also added to compensate for the extra weight. The SK-5-800 entered service in 1992, while the -900 entered service in [YEAR] and continued production until the SK-5 was replaced by the SK-7-300. As of 2018, 18 of the type are still in passenger service, with many more serving with cargo airlines. The SK-5's role at the forefront of the high-capacity long-haul market was eventually replaced with the 

In 1988, the SK-5-300 freighter was modified to transport parts for the KAS SK-6, known as the SK-5 "Dreamhauler". 3 aircraft were built, one serving @Fulgistan @Rihan, and @Gallambria. For the aircraft serving Gallambria, the lower cargo hold was replaced completely by fuel tanks, allowing the aircraft to safely cross the Adlantic Ocean to Fulgistan despite carrying a full load of Collins CEM56 engines. The role of these 3 aircraft were replaced by the similarly-modified SK-5

The SK-5 series culminated with the SK-5-400, which entered service in 1989. Its production line finally ended in May 2006 with the SK-5-400F, having lasted 36 years; the longest production run of any Skandinavisk jet aircraft.

VARIANTS

  • SK-5-100 (1970 - 1971)
  • SK-5-200 (1974 - 1984)
  • SK-5-200F (1977 - 1995)
  • SK-5-300 (1976 - 1987)
  • SK-5-300ER (1977 - 1990)
  • SK-5-500Adv (1989 - 2003)
  • SK-5-500F (1992 - 2006)

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-100)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 6,116 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-200)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 7,356 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-200F)

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 22 x LD7 pallets
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 47.34 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 7,356 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-300)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 50.46 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 9,254 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-300ER)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer)
  • Passenger Capacity: 380 (high-density), 325 (1-class), 285 (2-class), 255 (3-class)
  • Length: 51.97 m
  • Wingspan: 50.46 m
  • Height: 17.7 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 982 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 908 km/h
  • Range: 10,622 km
  • Service Ceiling: 42,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-400)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 410 (high-density), 373 (1-class), 323 (2-class), 293 (3-class)
  • Cargo Capacity: 32 x LD3 (lower)
  • Length: 61.62 m
  • Wingspan: 51.66 m
  • Height: 17.61 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 945 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 876 km/h
  • Range: 12,670 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-5-400F)

  • Crew: 3 (pilot, co-pilot, loadmaster)
  • Cargo Capacity: 26 x LD7 (main), 32 x LD3 (lower)
  • Length: 61.62 m
  • Wingspan: 51.66 m
  • Height: 17.61 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 945 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 876 km/h
  • Range: 7,320 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

Cebu_Pacific_Air_Airbus_A320_at_Cebu_Mac

 

VARIANTS

  • SK-6-100 (1982 - 1993)
  • SK-6-100ER (1984 - 1995)
  • SK-6-200 (1986 - 2006)
  • SK-6-200ER (1990 - 2005)
  • SK-6-200XR (1997 - 2006)
  • SK-6-300 (1995 - 2005)
  • SK-6-300ER (2001 - 2007)

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-100)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 172 (high-density), 155 (1-class), 143 (2-class)
  • Length: 45.01 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.02 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 4,346 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-100ER)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 139 (high-density), 130 (1-class), 117 (2-class)
  • Length: 39.73 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.25 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 5,195 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft

SPECIFICATIONS (SK-6-200)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Passenger Capacity: 172 (high-density), 155 (1-class), 143 (2-class)
  • Length: 45.01 m
  • Wingspan: 32.82 m
  • Height: 9.02 m
  • MTOW: 
  • Engines: 
  • Top Speed: 932 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 873 km/h
  • Range: 4,346 km
  • Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft
Edited by Andalla
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D-SERIES


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The D-45 is a long-range business jet, and Skandinavisk's. Most aircraft are operated privately, with some in military service as VIP transport. It is popular with large charter airlines because of its capability to cross the Oriental Ocean, but has also been used by premium regional airlines. The aircraft is designated as the C-36 in the Andallan Commonwealth Air Force.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Capacity: 14-19 passengers, 24 in high-density configuration
  • Length: 29.4 m
  • Wingspan: 28.51 m
  • Height: 7.9 m
  • Cruise Speed: 852 km/h
  • Top Speed: 936 km/h
  • Range: 12,620 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000ft
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J-SERIES


1434584998291.jpg

The J-1 Meteorit is a subsonic, single-seat jet fighter. Initially developed by the ACAAC and Saeb Aeronautik under the Joint Andallan Jet Fighter Project (Forenet Andska Stridsplanprojekt) as the Saeb K.9 to become the first Andallan-made jet aircraft, Saeb's share in the project was acquired by Skandinavisk in 1949 following the post-war arms manufacturing crash. At the time, the civil aviation industry was booming and Skandinavisk was only planning to enter the military aviation industry. After 9 years of development, the first fully-operational variant began production in 1951 as the Skandinavisk J-1 Meteorit. Though largely unsuccessful due to numerous factors including low endurance, faulty airframe, unremarkable performance and low demand, the Meteorit proved an important step in the development of Andallan jet aircraft. The Meteorit remained in scarce production until the introduction of the J-2 Komet in 1958.

VARIANTS

  • J-1 Meteorit (1951 - 1958)
  • I-1 Øgle (1952 - 1970)

SPECIFICATIONS (J-1)

  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Length: 13.59 m
  • Wingspan: 11.32 m
  • Height: 3.96 m
  • Top Speed: 957 km/h
  • Range: 915 km
  • Service Ceiling: 43,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-1)

  • Guns: 4 x 20mm autocannons
  • Rockets: Up to 16 x 76 mm or 8 x 127 mm air-to-ground rockets
  • Bombs: 2 x 1,000 lb bombs

1559702-large.jpg

The J-2 Komet is a transonic delta-wing interceptor fighter, and the first Andallan-made aircraft of its type. A J-2 Komet with serial number 58-023, nicknamed the "Mighty Skjellerup" (after the comet 38P/Skjellerup), holds the distinction of being the very first Andallan-made aircraft to break the sound barrier, in a controlled dive on 23 February 1959. The J-2 was known for its maneuverability, owing to its unusual combination of the T-tail and delta wing design. Due to the economic crisis, the J-2 remained in low numbers of production. Two years later, in 1960, the newly-established successor to the Andallan Commonwealth Air Command, the Andallan Commonwealth Air Force, was ready to authorize mass-production of the aircraft. Production continued until 1969.

VARIANTS

  • J-2A (1958 - 1967)
  • J-2B (1964 - 1969)

SPECIFICATIONS (J-2A)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, navigator)
  • Length: 17.15 m
  • Wingspan: 15.85 m
  • Height: 4.88 m
  • Top Speed: 1,140 km/h
  • Range: 1,530 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-2A)

  • Guns: 4 x 30mm autocannons

SPECIFICATIONS (J-2B)

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, navigator)
  • Length: 17.15 m
  • Wingspan: 15.85 m
  • Height: 4.88 m
  • Top Speed: 1,140 km/h
  • Range: 1,530 km
  • Service Ceiling: 52,000 ft

ARMAMENT (J-2B)

  • Guns: 4 x 30mm autocannons
  • Bombs: 4 x under-wing pylons for a total of 1,200 lbs of bombs

8fcff8d7f026184de9f5e910deb676ed.jpg

The J-3 Stjernetåge is a supersonic light fighter, and the first Andallan-made purpose-built supersonic aircraft. The J-3 was developed in response to an Andallan Commonwealth Air Force requirement for a "modernized and affordable" fighter design.

Edited by Andalla
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B-SERIES


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The B-1 Glød is a high-altitude, semi-stealth strategic bomber. It was initially scheduled for production in 1971, but several flaws in the design delayed the date to May of 1972. It is the ACAF's only strategic bomber aircraft. It has a built-in ECM suite to fend off against incoming missiles. The Glød's airframe served as the basis for the more advanced @Prymont F-F Cockroach bomber.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 5 (pilot, co-pilot, weapon systems officer, navigator, ECM officer)
  • Length: 29.59 m
  • Wingspan: 30.3 m
  • Height: 8.04 m
  • Top Speed: 1,236 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 953 km/h at 45,000 ft
  • Range: 4,392 km
  • Service Ceiling: 60,000 ft

ARMAMENT

  • 21 x 1,000 lb conventional bombs
  • 42 x 500 lb conventional bombs
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I-SERIES


18503777911_a3d05a9813_b.jpg&key=ae98abc

The I-4 Fremstød is a transonic advanced jet trainer. However, it can also serve as a lightly-armed combat aircraft. It was introduced in 1992 and remains in production.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot/instructor)
  • Length: 13.08 m
  • Wingspan: 9.94 m
  • Height: 4.6 m
  • Top Speed: 1,036 km/h
  • Range: 1,588 km

ARMAMENT

  • Hardpoints: 2 x air-to-air/air-to-ground missiles or external drop tanks
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N-SERIES


1024px-C-123K_ROKAF_Team_Spirit_1989.JPE

The N-1 Leverantör is a turboprop military transport aircraft and the first dedicated military transport aircraft developed by Skandinavisk. It entered production in 1958 and ended 1974. Only few remain in military service while a number of aircraft are privately-operated.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, radio operator/navigator)
  • Capacity: 60 troops or 24,000 lb payload
  • Length: 23.25 m
  • Wingspan: 33.53 m
  • Height: 10.39 m
  • Top Speed: 367 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 278 km/h
  • Range: 1,654 km

0523749.jpg?v=v40&key=62dac961596e2db318

The N-2 Stjärnlyft is Skandinavisk's only strategic airlifter. It is also the largest Andallan military aircraft ever produced. Production began in 1968 and ended 2001, with a second variant still in production. It has been in service with the ACAF for nearly 5 decades. One aircraft known as the White Dwarf holds the distinct record of being the longest-serving aircraft in the ACAF, beginning service in 1977.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 5-7 (pilot, co-pilot, 2 flight engineers, loadmaster, optional: second loadmaster, navigator)
  • Capacity: 154 troops, 123 paratroopers or 50,000 lb payload
  • Length: 51.3 m
  • Wingspan: 48.8 m
  • Height: 12.00 m
  • Top Speed: 912 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 790 km/h
  • Range: 4,723 km

1024px-50%2B61_German_Air_Force_Transall

The N-3 Reise is a turboprop tactical airlift transport. It is the ACAF's primary tactical airlift transport and has been in service since its introduction in 1973. While the original variant ended production in 1996, newer variants are still being built. The N-3 Reise production line is expected to last until 2030, then it will be replaced by an entirely new aircraft.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, loadmaster)
  • Capacity: 93 troops, 88 paratroopers or 35,275 lb payload
  • Length: 32.40 m
  • Wingspan: 40.03 m
  • Height: 11.65 m
  • Top Speed: 513 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 495 km/h
  • Range: 1,853 km

Lithuanian_Air_Force_Antonov_AN-26_(04).

The N-4 Løfteren is a twin-engine turboprop transport and electronic warfare aircraft. It began production in 1972 and ended 2001. The N-4 also has an electronic warfare (EW) variant, the E-1 Förundras. Though officially classified as a combat aircraft, it is built along the N-4 production line.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 4 (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, radio operator/navigator)
  • Capacity: 36 troops, 34 paratroopers or 12,100 lb payload
  • Length: 23.8 m
  • Wingspan: 29.3 m
  • Height: 8.58 m
  • Cruise Speed: 440 km/h
  • Range: 953 km

1024px-CASA_C-295_of_Polish_Air_Force,_R

The N-5 Odysse is a twin-engine turboprop tactical airlift aircraft. It was developed alongside a civilian variant, the NT-9 Iliaden, and was introduced in late 1998. It has twice the capacity of the N-4 while also boasting the new Flygmotor JR-910 turboprops, making it even faster than the N-3 Reise.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, co-pilot)
  • Capacity: 71 troops, 64 paratroopers or 20,600 lb payload
  • Length: 24.5 m
  • Wingspan: 25.8 m
  • Height: 8.61 m
  • Top Speed: 576 km/h
  • Cruise Speed: 480 km/h
  • Range: 1,350 km on full payload
  • Service Ceiling: 30,000 ft
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    • By Andalla
      The calendar read 5 July 1948, Monday. It had been a year since the Thalassan War had ended, when the Gioktons had surrendered and the @Sunset Sea Islands liberated from its oppressive leadership. It was a bloody war that saw the deaths of millions — military and civilian alike. It was not unusual that the Commonwealth had not yet recovered; yet despite this, the economy was, as a matter of fact, growing. People were looking for new ideas. And where else could they find new ideas other than Europa, the political, ideological, cultural, economical and technological center of the world? The opportunities were very promising. Yet despite all the possibilities, though, Europa was undeniably far — a trip across to Europa by sea could take up to three weeks, and in an increasingly competitive and fast-paced world, time was of the essence. People had to get there quicker, cheaper, and more efficiently.
      A few years back, while Thalassa was still caught within the tight grip of the menace it had created itself, the Skandinavisk SK-4 had begun production. At that time, Andalla was too preoccupied to even take notice its new creation, the same creation that would soon carry thousands of passengers across Argis and Europa each week — all in the name of Andalla. The SK-4 was a ground-based aircraft, which at the time was not as attractive as the large, powerful flying boats of Saeb. What it did have to boast about, however, was its impressive range - over 6,000 kilometers. And as it was a land-based aircraft, it could reach important inland cities such as Toledo, O'polis, Saipuo, Moskovo, New Halsham, Girk, Bogd Gioro, Delta, Novumcastrum, and Centridge City. It had the power to end the era of flying boats, yet nobody bothered to take notice... except the airlines.
      One could never really explain properly what was going on with airlines during the war. While there were those who wanted to flee the violence, others chose to stay. Their trained employees were drafted into the military, leaving many positions empty — some airlines choosing to temporarily fill these positions with untrained workers, or leaving them unoccupied altogether for the sake of safety. Mismanagement and inexperience quickly became one of the leading causes of incidents and accidents of Andallan carriers during the war. There also loomed in the air the threat of Giokton fighters; they would often harass or even shoot down the defenselss airliner upon discovering it during a routine patrol. It was for this reason that airline passengers were required to wear oxygen masks for the entire duration of the flight above the Tiauhai Sea, in the event of a rapid pressure loss. Patched-up bullet holes on the wings, tail and fuselage became a common sight on Andallan airliners, if the aircraft had not already been downed. But as the war went on and Giokton air force numbers slowly dwindled, more airlines became confident to resume operations, while a handful of airlines had also been founded in hopes of exploiting a new-found source of profit. And when they finally had the chance to begin operating their shiny new SK-4s, they put them to work as soon as possible. 
      This was the "Northern Route", one of the most heavily-traveled air routes during the late 1940's to the mid-1960's. It ran from Andalla to Central Europa or @Orioni, with stops at @Iverica, @Prymont (Ostport), Deltannia and finally to wherever in Europa the passenger was destined for. It remained that way until 1964, when the transoriental-capable SK-3 Series 20 jet airliner entered service. It was also in the same year that the airport at Burkini opened; situated near-perfectly in the middle of the Oriental Ocean, the new airport allowed a transoriental crossing to be done in two 4,000-kilometer legs.
      But for now, the Northern Route was their only choice. Airlines could make it through in under 5 days, with many competing against each other for the fastest passage. But for passengers, it was heaven. Their wildest dreams had come true; no longer would they have to take 3 weeks by ocean liner just to reach Europa. Weeks became days, ships became planes, and seas became skies.
      From the corner of his window, Daniel Arvesson could see another SK-4 take off. This one belonged to Østhav Lufttransport, one of the several airlines created solely on the hopes of exploiting this new Silk Road. To him, these airlines were naive and ignorant. It took more than just a startup to be able to travel the Northern Route, because flying was expensive, not only for the passengers but even for the airline itself. In a way, every country charged flyover fees — that is, if they even allowed foreign aircraft to pass through. And though Andalla had been able to at least negotiate discounted fees with Iverica, Ostport and Deltannia, aircraft had to land. And once they were on the ground, airport fees entered the question. Combined with several other fees, taxes and administrative issues made operating an airline an extremely difficult task — one that could drive these "start-up airlines" into bankruptcy within a mere few years. It was a disaster. And somehow, it was Arvesson's duty to fix it.
      In the background, Arvesson heard the faint sound of a phone's sharp ring. His secretary, Mirjam Byström, came in the office.
      "Sir, Minister Holme's on the phone. He wants to speak to you."
      "Why didn't he call me in my office..? Ah, never mind, hold on."
      ...
      "Director-General, you have been reading the news regarding our Northern Route, have you?"
      "Ah, yes, of course Minister Holme. Daily."
      "Then, surely, you have heard of what happened in Delta?"
      "Definitely, Minister. I believe we must act on it as soon as possible."
      "Exactly. And what would you propose in order to fix it?"
      "Perhaps a bilateral agreement standardizing aviation regulations could help... But we may not be able to accomplish such a thing anytime soon."
      "Not at all, Director, that is possible. You may want to contact the Deltannian aviation authority... What was the name again? Uh... anyway. I was trying to say, you should contact them and arrange for a bilateral meeting setting the foundations for standardized regulations... I'll bet you they're just as willing as we are to standardize them, especially since the perpetrators only did it for the money. I'm sure we both know that Deltannia is an important stop on the Northern Route, and we can't afford to lose it... Am I understood, Director-General?
      "Yes, sir. I'll arrange a meeting as soon as possible."
      "Thank you."
      Arvesson wasn't amused; Minister Holme was crazy. It wasn't like Andalla and Deltannia could organize a bilateral meeting in a flash. But that was what Minister Holme wanted — Arvesson could not let him down, lest he lose his job as Director-General of the Andallan Aviation Authority. After all, the problem was quite significant — though it was a scandal by a small band of Deltannian airport officials, it did highlight an important flaw in their aviation regulations...
      Delta was, undoubtedly, the most important stop along the journey. Much like a busy bus terminal, it was where passengers would disembark and board another plane for wherever they wished to go. When one traveled the Northern Route, landing at Delta signified the final leg of the journey... and that the aircraft did not crash somewhere in the endless sea of ice surrounding it. Icing was definitely not uncommon when flying in the extreme cold of the Argic Circle. When ice crept up to the wings or vertical stabilizer, the pilot could lose control of the aircraft. When ice got into the engine, there would be nothing moving the aircraft forward. And when ice got into both, you'd know where exactly you were — in the middle of a frozen hell.
      A few days ago, several Deltannian airport officials found a difference between Andallan and Deltannian aviation regulations — one that could, if properly implemented, restrict the passage of any Andallan aircraft within Deltannian airspace. But they weren't going for the safety — instead they only increased flyover fees, airport fees and other taxes for all Andallan aircraft. And through their network of shady deals and accomplices, those extra fees went to... them.
      Once their plot became known, there was nothing the government could do — aviation regulations were aviation regulations, implemented only to ensure the safety of anyone flying within Deltannian airspace. So instead they halted the increase in taxes and prohibited any Andallan aircraft from entering or exiting Deltannian airspace, effectively grounding all Andallan aircraft in Deltannia, Ostport, and elsewhere in Europa. Being the most important stop along the Northern Route, the entire future of the Andallan airline industry was placed in jeopardy...
      — TO BE CONTINUED —
      This topic was formerly disputed by Vocenae. As a result, all mentions of Vocenae have been replaced with Deltannia. The discussion is located here.
      OOC: Prelude to the establishment of an ICAO for Europa. I believe @Gallambria and @Orioni is working on a version of the UN, so we could say this organization evolved into whatever ICAO's counterpart in the Europa UN is.
      A very special thanks to ORIONI for fixing some issues while I was away. Tak!
    • By Andalla
      The following is a list of prominent Andallan arms manufacturers. Until the 1950s, most of Andalla's arms manufacturing was controlled by the government. In 1949, the Arms Industry Privatization Act was ratified, granting more leeway for privately-owned arms manufacturers. The present Andallan arms industry is dominated by Skandinavisk, Faerfrisk Arms and Kungsborg Land Systems.
      SKANDINAVISK
      Skandinavisk Aircraft Manufacturing (Officially Skandinavisk Flygproducent A/S) is the largest manufacturer of aircraft in Andalla and the Andallan Commonwealth Air Force's primary supplier of both combat and transport aircraft.
      Need I explain more? Go click that link.😉
      SAEB GROUP
      The Saeb Group is a largely-defunct defense conglomerate and Andalla's largest arms manufacturer during the Thalassan War. It was established by Anton Bergqvist Saeb in 1913 as Saeb Aeronautik (Saeb Aeronautics), following the early success of Skandinavisk. Bergqvist envisioned Saeb to become the leading aircraft manufacturer in Thalassa, producing primarily flying boats to serve the many Thalassan islands. Saeb soon became the dominant manufacturer of military aircraft in Andalla, supplying significant numbers of Commonwealth Army Air Command (Samväldet Haer Luftkommando) aircraft. In the civilian market, Saeb's flying boats competed very closely with Skandinavisk's landplanes; Saeb emerged as the larger manufacturer during the latter years of the 1920s. In 1936, Bergqvist began to venture into the production of military vehicles, developing the P.1 armored car and establishing Saeb Dynamik (Saeb Dynamics). It was followed by Saeb Armen (Saeb Arms) in 1939, which was highly successful and would continue on to produce most of the Andallan military's small arms. Saeb Aeronautik was highly successful during the Thalassan War, as demand for new military equipment hit a record high. As the Thalassan War came to a close, it was decided that Saeb would begin development of a civil aircraft. It was during this time that demand for military equipment continued to fall across the region, and among those largely affected included Saeb. Unable to continue development, Saeb Aeronautik was forced to sell its jet fighter project to Skandinavisk, which had expressed its desire to begin a combat aircraft program. In 1965, the Saeb Group was forced to sell Saeb Armen to rival Faerfrisk, cementing its position as the leading small arms manufacturer in Andalla.
      Today, Saeb Aeronautik continues to retain its prominence and is currently the second largest aircraft manufacturer in Andalla next to Skandinavisk. No longer having a foothold in the military aircraft market, Saeb Aeronautik mainly produces turboprop and regional jets for the Thalassan market. Saeb Dynamik continues to produce military vehicles in small numbers, with most of its business lost to Kungsborg Land Systems.
      FAERFRISK ARMS
      Faerfrisk Arms (Faerfrisk Armen A/S) is the primary manufacturer of small arms in Andalla, and one of the largest in Thalassa. It started out in 1939 as a factory producing bullets for the ACA, and later Saeb Arms. As demand rose, Faerfrisk (Then Faerfrisk Munitions or Faerfrisk Krigsmateriel A/S) began to produce parts for military vehicles. As demand for military equipment fell following the end of the Thalassan War, Faerfrisk entered into a period of stagnation and recovery; Faerfrisk's military vehicle business went into liquidation in 1953. With massive amounts of surplus arms available at cheap prices after the Thalassan War, it was decided that Faerfrisk would begin development of more advanced, more capable guns to be released when demand for the surplus arms fell. Following the rise of the assault rifle in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Faerfrisk enjoyed a period of success. In 1965, Faerfrisk purchased its largest rival, Saeb Armen, leaving it as the sole major small arms manufacturer in the country.
      KUNGSBORG LAND SYSTEMS
      Kungsborg Land Systems (Kungsborg Jordsystem A/S) is a subsidiary of Kungsborg Heavy Industries (Kungsborg Storindustrigren A/S) responsible for the production of military land vehicles including tanks, rocket artillery and trucks. Formerly Christensen Defense Engineering, a subsidiary of Christensen Automotive, Kungsborg Heavy Industries acquired the company in 1992.
      ASKANGER STEEL YARD
      Askanger Steel Yard (Askanger Stålvaerft A/S) is the largest Andallan shipbuilding company. Established in 1754 as the Royal Askanger Naval Dockyard (Kongeligen Askanger Flottvaerfter) and also encompassed the artillery factories surrounding it. After the kingdom was replaced with a Commonwealth in [YEAR], the Royal Askanger Naval Dockyard was renamed to the Askanger Steel Yard (Askanger Stålvaerft) and its surrounding factories were sold to the private sector. Since then, the Askanger Steel Yard has constructed many of the largest Andallan-made vessels. The company also operates several other shipyards on the island of Himøy.
      BOFORSEN
      Boforsen is a manufacturer of heavy machine guns and heavy weaponry including autocannons and naval guns. Among its well-known products include the 40 mm M36 anti-aircraft/multi-purpose gun, the 51 mm Mk.20 dual-purpose naval gun, and the Skytten 155 mm self-propelled gun.
      GRIPEN
      Gripen Artilerieselskab A/S is a manufacturer of heavy guns and artillery, including naval artillery, field artillery and tank guns. It has been the dominant manufacturer of naval guns in Andalla since the early 1800s. Its headquarters are located in Askanger, near the Askanger Steel Yard. The company was founded in 1788 after businessman Gjermund Hatlestad purchased one of the artillery factories in the Askanger Steel Yard. Though it was unsuccessful, Hatlestad acquired more factories with the money he was earning from his other businesses and eventually grew the company to become a major producer of naval artillery.
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    • Murdercubism is now an officially recognised religion Alphonse von Wallenstein, 09 December 2018 15:12 A young "kommando" devotee of the Murder Cube paying his respects at the Prince Willem Armoury Museum In 2004, artist Norm Alfred unveiled a masterpiece at the Prince Willem Armoury Museum, Gottesberg. He envisioned his “magnum opus” - hundreds of discarded firearms sculpted into a giant cube - to be the creation of art through the destruction of weapons, a powerful and lasting monument to peace. But as old wisdom tells us, beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Alfred certainly saw beauty in his work. It’s a fantastic work of art, after all. However, to the wider Rhodellian internet community, it was beautiful in a different, more grizzly way. The exhibit opened to the general public without much fanfare. But, within weeks, hundreds of visitors were suddenly flocking to see it. These beholders weren’t the daisy-chaining, “kumbaya”-singing hippies Alfred had expected. Instead, his art piece had become the unlikely pilgrimage site of many thousands of young Rhodellian netizens wielding gas masks and old surplus rifles (jokingly referred to as “nuggets”). Each would kneel to the great monolith, offering tributes ranging from cans of Chef Boyardee to “milk for the cornflakes”. Together they would chant “Ave nex alea” and "Cheeki breeki" among other tongue-in-cheek slogans . They saw no symbol of peace, but a tribute to death and destruction. To them, this was their almighty monolith: The Murder Cube. Every year, dozens of thousands of young Rhodellians embark on pilgrimages to the Murder Cube. Pilgrims come from all walks of life. They range from students wishing for the best marks on their school marksmanship exams, to conscripts entering national service after college, to boots praying for success as professional soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors. Increased traffic to the Prince Willem Armoury Museum has led to the Murder Cube being moved to bigger rooms (twice), road improvements being constructed all over the local area, and a bustling local tourist industry capitalising on the year-wide influx of pilgrims. None of this shows any sign of slowing down.  What might have started out as an in-joke from some shady corner of the internet has grown into a staple of Rhodellian popular culture. As of December 6, 2018, 14 years after its creation, the glorious Murder Cube had ascended to new heights transcending that of cyberspace. A new addition appeared on the Department of State’s roster of officially recognised religions: Murdercubism. News of this grew viral across many social media platforms, with many struggling to believe that worship of the Murder Cube was now, unironically, eligible to be recorded on legal documents. The majority of responses are positive thus far with many Rhodellians internet communities celebrating this development as a cultural victory. On the other hand, many other netizens felt more skeptical, stating that “the joke went too far” and that Murdercubism’s recent recognition as a valid religion was a "letdown to the many other smaller and unrecognised cultures present in a truly rich and diverse Rhodellian nation”.  Regardless of Murdercubism's official status, countless young devotees will continue to embark on grand pilgrimages just to see their monolith and praise its glorious name wherever they may be. It seems that the Murder Cube, Rhodellia’s unofficial patron deity, is here to stay.
    • Vardin El Al hadn't canceled flights to Aluxia's capital since the civil war had erupted. Four Shai operatives had been assigned to make their way to the territory held by the Free Aluxian Army and to provide their 'services.' The plane had landed at Vardin's modest airport - it didn't see many flights daily. On their plane alone, there were only a handful of people - exactly 10. Some in the airline business would say that operating such flights were unsustainable but the Government mandated the company continue its schedule on an illusion of confidence in the current Imperial throne and to 'be prepared for further activity' should the need be required. The head of the operation was an experienced agent by the name Raphael Bauman, who had shown talent in basic training to be given an opportunity to serve his country in the reconnaissance squad of the elite 1st Golani Division of the Army. Following several successful operations, the nation's intelligence bureau, the Shai, heard of his talents and had him brought off the front lines and to work from the shadows. His instructions were quite explicit: connect with the Free Army by whatever means. It wasn't the first time his superiors had given him no guidance whatsoever. The Aluxian officials glanced at his passport with considerable care. Clearly, there were tensions and they were not as much to do with the war as it was from where he was coming from, let alone his own appearance. Despite this, the Aluxian inspectors had bigger fish to catch than cause an incident with him and so let him on his way. He emerged from the terminal building and witnessed the first hints of concern in Vardin. Soldiers were everywhere. From the building entrance to the gates of the entire airport. The reigning monarch didn't take anything for granted. He may have controlled the capital but fighting a civil war in this day in age was far different than if it had occurred at the turn of the last century, or even further back in time. Due to the war, travelers were light and there was all but one car waiting out front - it was for him and his colleagues. "Your friend Uri sent me to collect you," said the driver. Raphael nodded and nodded to his fellow operatives and all got into the car. Just as they exited the airport, they were halted by soldiers. "Where are you going?" asked the commanding soldier. "Tikva Mission, Embassy Quarter." The squad of soldiers eyed them and returned their gaze to the driver. "These two trucks of men will escort you," the commanding officer said. The driver nodded and turned back to his passengers. "Paranoia over rebel attack," he said, "has them all on edge." Bauman didn't respond and thought to himself particularly because the rebels were hundreds of miles away and wherein no position to assault the capital anytime soon.  The now-convoy of vehicles made their way towards the center of the capital. Driving through the suburban ring and into the center, soldiers were ever-present. "Martial law is in effect," said one loudspeaker they drove past. "Please comply with all regulations." The driver remarked, "it's been like this for nearly two weeks. Won't be changing anytime soon." Soon enough the vehicles reached the barricaded Embassy Quarter where hundreds of Aluxians were arguing with soldiers and law enforcement personnel to get through - all of whom wanted to escape the country and the chaos unfolding. Their escort peeled away and returned to the airport while their car slipped through the gates and approached the Mission. Ambassador Asimov was waiting for them outside. "Brothers and sisters, I am happy to hear that you made it," he announced as the group of four got out. "We have much to talk about it, Bauman," the ambassador paused, "I have a gift for you in the basement, I will have Aram bring it up." The group of five moved to Uri's study to begin their meeting. Idle chit-chat while Aram brought Raphael's 'gift' upstairs. He placed it on the table in front of them, "thank you, you are dismissed." He took his leave. "Now, let's get right to the chance. We do not have long. You might have gotten into Vardin, getting out of it is incredibly difficult," he paused before continuing. "I have some items that may aid your mission including a rough sketch of the Vardin sewers compiled by some...contacts I have within the Imperial Security units here. I recommend you use it to guide yourselves through to the outskirts of the city. I have some burner phones with pre-paid cards for inter-team communications. I have also placed in a small directory of essential numbers. Do not lose it under any circumstances. Eat it if you must, but memorize first." "Along with the standard gear you'd probably need. I've also managed to sneak you a few weapons that I purchased on the 'grey' market. Ammo is also included. Be careful with your supply. I am aware of your brief mission getting in contact with the FAA. It is much too challenging to go straight across the country where the fighting is stewing. Instead, there is another location that may be far easier to liaise with them. Make your way north to Chukba. I hear they are making a push there in the very near future." The ambassador scanned the room. "Any questions?" "What about the 10 million Shekels we're contributing," said one of the four operatives. "I've already taken care of it. Do not worry about it. You have more important things that concerning yourself with the disbursement of dark money." Seeing no other inquiries, he concluded his conversation with the group, "stay here in the embassy this evening, and make your way to the sewer grate in the back of the compound after midnight. You have to be out of the sewers by sunrise." Each operative shook his hand and got up. Raphael was the last to stand up and shake Uri's hand. He was pulled in closer. "You have to hurry and get to Chukba. I haven't heard from Kuzha Yosef Khaimov and Mikel Levitin in five days." Bauman nodded. "We'll find out what's going on." Uri escorted him out to his colleagues. "Feel free to use the third-floor guest rooms to prepare."
    • The Kirvinska counterpart to the Rihannsu and Shffahkian plans of expansion on Aurelia, Blood in the Snow, takes the form of the unfortunate meddling and panache that could come from only one man: a young son of an old Duke's Musketeer, set out to a border province on word of a possible commission. The hot-blooded energy of his youth drives him to actions that any other man would have ignored, and through a series of unfortunate duels, the status of the Cagora valley is suddenly thrown into jeopardy. The once self-sustaining river valley, robbed of its leadership, is driven into the arms of its former overlord- the newly ascendant Kirvina, bolstered by its new status as a member of a powerful League- the Aurelian League. Blood in the Snow plays out in five acts, the first introducing the young man driving its events and the unfortunate mission which took him to Cagora to begin with. It is not an eventline which directly affects most of you out there, but is simply a narrative adventure for your literary pleasure, and should be treated as such: a window into the flair and flamboyance of a culture long gone. Through it one may hear the stories of things lost to the past- duels, noble love, and ultimately the fate of a Duchy. I am open to take any questions about it, the way and timeframe in which it will be completed, and the nature of the political climate surrounding it. Barring any changes, the current completion date for this expansion will be MARCH 1, 2019. The layout of the Cagora river valley is placed below for your convenience. Moderators Involved: @Sunset Sea Islands Players Involved: @Rihan @Shffahkia List to be updated at leisure.
    • @Orioni, I have taken some time to think about the map placement and this is probably the best option as I can justify the Samarran Valley right on the southern border. Plus even if Cashar is 'dormant' no harm in at least having someone share a border with. If this is the ultimate placement, then placement of cities remain except that Harel is at the confluence of the river and the sea, Katzilya is to its right, and Adora further to the right a third of the way to the eastern edge. Ayalon would be placed inland, rather central on the image above. I think adding any other cities to this plot would make it too busy. Let me know if there is anything else you need.
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