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Eskeocha

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Eskeocha last won the day on July 26

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About Eskeocha

  • Birthday 03/08/1997

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    United States of America
  • Interests
    Theater, Dungeons and Dragons, American Football, Baseball, Writing

NationStates

  • NS
    Eskeocha
  • Capital
    Cranarie
  • HoS
    Captain Milo Yuskwag

Contact Methods

  • Discord
    ajblackout #4971

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  1. Hello Orioni, After the discussions on the claim and the feedback, as well as a little clarification, I believe I have figured out what the map would look like. I have created two different maps and would like to know what you think. You will notice there is a new area called the Eskeok National Rainforest on the maps. This is not meant to be something I want on the international map or anything, I just figured it would be useful to include as a reference since it is a vast Temperate Rainforest that is heavily impacted by the climate. Here is the first map, which is based on your redesigns. If this is the one we use, this is where I would like to put Abasol. As well, I changed the shape of the passage a bit to look more realistic, if it is ok with you. I do know you will probably change it a bunch to make it look real as well. I also put together this map below, which follows the coast, my suggestion. I would prefer to use this map, though I am ok if we use the first one. I just think the borders and nation shape look cleaner here. This would move Mt. Caskada. If either of these are over 350,000, please trim what you need to get to the limit. I would just really like to include at least one of the two mountain ranges. Thank you again, and please let me know if either of the two maps works for you! Regards, Eskeocha
  2. Hi @Orioni, Thank you so much for your feedback. To clarify what I meant by Alaskan, my culture is partly inspired by first nation natives, particularly the Tlingit. There are some changes that will be introduced as I am worldbuilding and roleplay, but they are my intended bouncing off point. I hope that works for you. I knew my nation was quite large, I am not so talented with geographical software, so I had no idea how to ensure I would not go over 350,000. Thank you for letting me know. Regarding the changes you brought forward, I made some adjustments of my own I wanted to run by you. This is largely because, while I like many of the ideas you brought forth, I have a few concerns regarding the overall shape of my nation and some features that I have been intending to make use of: I am totally open to removing the northern region and instead having the river follow the border towards Mastikan. I think that is equally as good, I just started further north arbitrarily. Regarding the Mountains and Mt. Caskada, would it be possible instead to have the border go further south and I will take the lower mountain range instead? I can move Caskada there with no problem, and I would be able to preserve Abasol. Part of the idea I had for Abasol was that it would be a city built around an old Christian settlement from the original expansion of the religion westward. If it is an issue of coastline, please let me know. Cranarie Passage is my biggest concern, as it is very significantly how I have shaped my nation for a long time, even before I arrived in Eurth. Is it at all possible to keep it? Removing it from my nation would require a lot of worldbuilding upheaval and changing that I am not prepared for. If this is absolutely off the table, I understand, it will, however, take me a long time to figure out how to solve this, as it promotes many internal challenges regarding how my nation is currently set up. I have attached a picture below, overlapping my original submission. The old pieces I am removing are crossed out in purple, and the long purple line is my new border suggestion. Please let my know if there is a specific problem with Cranarie Passage, or if it was just a suggestion to fix land size. I am ok with going under 350,000 a bit if it means keeping the passage. Thank you again! Regards, Eskeocha
  3. Map Request by Eskeocha Nation in Eurth: Eskeocha Flag: (I apologize for the image size, I do not know how to change it) Capital name: Cranarie Capital location: (Please see star on claim request image) Factbook link: https://iiwiki.us/wiki/Eskeocha Newsroom link: Culture: The two central cultures are Eskeok (The Eskeocha Tribe) and Ahranaian (We have agreed that he would be a former colonizer, but are still working out details). Eskeok is akin to Alaskan first-nation, and please refer to Ahrana for Ahranaian. Climate: Eskeocha is a Sup-Arctic, cold weather climate. It has its fair share of mountains and forests and rivers, though they are all extremely cold weather, often hitting 0 farenheit in the winters and no more than 60 farenheit at highest in the summers. For more information, see the climate information of real world Alaska as a comparison. Location: This is the location I would like to request. I know it is quite large and it has a water passage going right through it, but the intention of my country is to be vast with very little population and tons of beauty. As well, the water passage is essential to my nation's setup as it exists now. I understand if these things are not entirely feasible, I would really like them if they could at all be a reality. I chose a lesser populated area in case that helps ease conflict in the decision. History: Before the arrival of settlers and traders in the eastern region, the land was inhabited solely by the Eskeocha tribe, a group of natives who lived in pockets around the region's passage, the mountains, and the temperate rainforest. Due to the terrain being difficult to navigate in many locations, the tribe developed small settlements that acted like cities. These cities would interact infrequently, although they would navigate their way to each other just often enough to trade, communicate, celebrate, and continue to share a single culture. Settlers from Ahrana would eventually arrive and interacted relatively frequently with the members of the Eskeocha tribe. This encouraged both the settlers to learn Eskeok, the local language, and for tribe members to learn outside languages such as English. The two groups were generally kind to each other, as the mountainous and difficult to traverse land gave them more reason to work together than apart. This cultural behavior developed and fostered relationships and appreciations over time, such as for local art and wildlife. This continued for as long as the two groups lived in this style with limited help from this outside world. In the 1960s, Ahrana had reason to end their involvement with Eskeocha. The land was not gaining them any profits - there were periods in which they were losing money supporting the settlers of the territory - and the nation needed to focus on other things. Due to events, the nation decided it was no longer sensible to hold on to the territory, and in February of 1964, they released the land to the settlers of the region. The settlers managed to survive on their own quite successfully over the year, but separation from each other made land disputes and trading somewhat of a challenge. In late 1964, leaders from the settlements and the tribe gathered together and agreed on the formation of a new nation, a confederacy of regions that would work together to thrive in the land. By April of 1965, the group had come up with an agreement and drafted a loose constitution of confederacy, officially recognizing the land as a new nation. They called this land Eskeocha, after the tribe that had first lived in the land. They continue to live as one nation, extremely large, yet miniscule in population. Stats: Population: [SMALL] [0]; 1,142,939 citizens GDP: [SMALL] [0]; 7,410 GDP (I'm not good with economics, I don't know numbers or units for this) Land Area: [VERY HIGH] [4]; As big as possible please, Eskeocha is supposed to be absolutely massive with a tiny population, just like Alaska. Thank you, and I hope this is an acceptable claim!
  4. Repeal Efforts Begin Circulation 25 July 2020 Aven Cordaka Late last night, after almost a week of fighting between residents of Mastikan and South Eskeocha, employees of Eskeocha Timber have drafted a proposal to repeal the Monument of Heritage Status of the Eskeok National Rainforest. This comes on the tail end of many riots and disruptions of peace in the city of Jenifer, including residents of multiple boroughs. Over the past two days, police have begun forcibly removing all residents of South Eskeocha from the Mastikan city, drawing condemnation from all other boroughs in the region aside from White Tip and Mastikan itself. Upon completion of the proposal, which would both remove the Eskeok National Rainforest's heritage status and, as an effort of compromise, limit police power to remove an Eskeochan citizen from any borough, is expected to be under debate today by the Mastikan Borough board for submission to the Frontier Coalition. It is believed this proposal will pass with great ease. Should the proposal to remove the rainforest's status pass into the coalition, whether or not this writing will be approved by the coalition is unclear. The original vote, occurring one week ago, passed with a vote of 17 - 15 in a close decision. In order for a repeal to be approved, at least 20 of the 32 coalition representatives must vote yes to the proposal. It is expected that the original 15 voters against the changing of the rainforest's status will vote for this new proposal, and eight different other representatives have expressed concern after the violence, making their opinions unknown. Many citizens are concerned should the repeal pass through the coalition - it is strongly believed this will escalate fighting and create a divide in Eskeocha that has never existed before. Huren Okonowanok, the Eskeocha Tribe Leader, has begun consideration of reaching out to other nations with native groups for support or advice. Following the development of this proposal, we will provide you with more information. The status of the coalition proposals can be found on our website, nationalpost.esk .
  5. Fighting Breaks Out in the South 21 July 2020 Aven Cordaka Tensions have begun to rise today in southern Eskeocha as fighting has begun between the boroughs of Mastikan and South Eskeocha. On the border of the two boroughs and of the Eskeok National Rainforest, many citizens of the two boroughs began brawling violently, leaving twenty-two people severely injured. No one was killed in the fighting. The fighting lasted for almost an hour and a half, as police were hesitant to break anyone up using firearms, as they feared it could lead to citizens beginning to use their hunting weapons for this cause in the future. This is not the first incident of violence as a result of the new lumber laws, as riots broke out in Jenifer a short time ago. Furious over the recent matters involving the restriction of harvesting lumber in the Eskeok National Rainforest, the two boroughs have been targeting each other for the past two weeks politically and in the media, and to this point, the issue has expanded further, becoming a matter of government involvement in the boroughs. Several boroughs including Cranarie Passage South, Passage’s End, and Abasol Bay have declared their support for South Eskeocha, believing the government should play a larger role in national politics, while Harinak, White Tip, and Tokoway have shown support for Mastikan and believe that governing power should remain primarily in the hands of the boroughs. This has increased a political divide in the nation, causing many to fear that the country may introduce political parties for the first time in its 55 year history. Frontier Captain Milo Yuskwag spoke publicly on the matter, stating, “We in the capital condemn the violence we have seen from our brothers and sisters. This is an irresponsible reaction to our lawmaking and shines a bad light on our nation in the eyes of world leaders. We ask that this fighting stops, and that you reconsider how you chose to protest, perhaps by choosing more peaceful means. We do pray for the healing of those who were injured. As well, when the frontier board intervenes, we do it with reason. I believe heartily in the power being relegated to the boroughs, but sometimes national response is necessary.” Citizens of Mastikan appeared unhappy with the response and have begun to claim the Frontier Captain and his board are usurping their power. As the story continues, we will come to you with more information. The timeline of events of the Rainforest Riots can be found on our website, nationalpost.esk .
  6. Violence Rises in the Southern Boroughs 20 July 2020 Aven Cordaka Rioting broke out in the city of Jenifer in early hours this morning by employees of the Jenifer Lumber Supply Co. and Eskeocha Timber. Three people were killed in the event, a rare occurrence for Eskeocha. The disturbance is believed to be in direct response to the Frontier Coalition’s passing of the proposal to declare the Eskeok National Rainforest a national monument of heritage, preventing it from being used as a source for timber by lumber supply companies. The two companies whose employees were greatly involved in the riot are significantly impacted by this new law, as the borough board of Mastikan had dispensed permits to multiple companies including these two to begin cutting down wood in the forest in October of last year. Borough Captain Tomas Carapacho of Mastikan released a statement on the riot from the Borough seat in Mastikan city, declaring, “The events of this morning are very unfortunate. Here at the borough seat, the hearts of the board go out to the families of those who passed. We do not condone riots or senseless violence in Mastikan, yet we must also recognize the cause for which these men and women are speaking up. This decision by the Frontier Coalition to prevent our borough from harvesting timber is an infringement on our rights as a borough. Our nation’s charter of confederacy gives explicit rights to the boroughs to govern their land, and this right has been violated. We will not rest until we have been returned our right to collect our lumber where we choose.” South Eskeocha Borough Captain Elder Morokok responded, condemning the statements of Carapacho, calling them “Uninformed” and “Promoting violence and unrest in our nation.” Borough Captain Edder Ediani of Cranarie Passage South and Eskeocha Frontier Captain Milo Yuskwag have yet to respond. Updates on the story, including arrest information and the identities of the three deceased will be found on our website, nationalpost.esk.
  7. Newest Proposal Passes Coalition 19 July 2020 Aven Cordaka A decision has been made today regarding the national status of the Eskeok National Rainforest located in southern Eskeocha. For the past year, a debate has arisen regarding the rights of locals to use trees from the rainforest as a source of local lumber. The harvesting of Eskeok Rainforest trees began last November, when natives of the borough Mastikan began cutting down trees in the eastern sections of the rainforest. This upset many natives and environmental rights supporters, prompting action by the Mastikan borough board. A decision was made in a split vote, 12-10, to allow the use of lumber from the rainforest as a local lumber source, passing in January of this year. South Eskeocha and Cranarie Passage South, two other boroughs that share portions of the rainforest, disputed this decision by Mastikan, claiming Mastikan has no right to make the decision without consultation with the other boroughs since they also share territory. Mastikan disagreed with this claim, stating that each borough is responsible for their own region of the forest. With no eminent solution to the rainforest dispute, as it has grown to be called, South Eskeocha submitted a proposal to the Frontier Coalition, Eskeocha’s national governing body, to declare the rainforest a national monument of heritage. Proposals on this level are infrequent, with only approximately twelve sent to the coalition annually, as Eskeocha’s main governance is delegated to the boroughs. This proposal remained on the floor for six months, lasting from February to July, when, at 4:46pm today, a law was officially passed recognizing the Eskeok National Rainforest as a Monument of Heritage, joining the ranks of the Ontok Glacier and Mt. Caskada. Updates on the story, including details of the proposal and information on Monuments of Heritage will be found on our website, nationalpost.esk .
  8. The Independent Frontier of Eskeocha An Informational Factbook about the Nation This link will take you to the iiWiki factbook for Eskeocha. The stats I intend to use for Eskeocha are as follows: The Independent Frontier of Eskeocha Population: Low [0], 1.12 million citizens GDP: Low [0], 7,410 GDP Land Area: Very High [4], 347,600 km^2 Eskeocha is designed to be massive in size, with a very small population that inhabits a very small amount of inhabitable land. Having as big of a nation in area as possible would be much appreciated.
  9. A small neighborhood in Nintook, Eskeocha, the hometown of the writer. The History of the Eskeocha Tribe - Second Edition by Jelli Melerick and Caske Staaven Preface by Tove Barokog When Professors Melerick and Staaven of the Cranarie National University approached me to write the opening pages of their newest textbook, I will readily admit I was quite confused. Why would they not ask a professional writer or a historian? What interest should they have in asking a lowly fisherman? Though I had many doubts and questions about the proposal, I am never one to reject a request from a friend. I have known Jelli Melerick for a long time, and will go to significant lengths to help such a wonderful woman with a task. I believe now I understand, after composing this forward to their work, this extensive history of the tribe to which I belong, why they asked me rather than a researcher of the tribe’s history. They do not want another of their own opinion. They are not interested in having their own perspective yet again in the text. They want a true Eskeocha tribe member, the story of the typical Eskeochan life. In my attempt to honor the wants of my peers, the task they have set before me, I have composed for you, the reader, student, professor, or whomever you may be, of this text, a brief selection of accounts from my life, stories that I feel define my heritage as an Eskeochan. I was six years old when I attended my first potlatch. It was very overwhelming, and there is little I remember, though what I do remember is quite vivid. A potlatch is a ceremony, a “gift-giving,” if you will, that will often mark a significant occasion such as the ascent to adulthood, the end of mourning, or the naming of a child. I had attended one for my cousin, a skilled woodworker who had spent the better part of the past year carving and painting a large totem pole that now stands, to this day, in the center of my hometown of Nintook. It is a beautiful piece of art, and it constantly reminds me, every time I return home to visit my parents, of the beauty and richness of the background from which I come. This potlatch had lots of smoke; I remember barely being able to see. It also had a healthy amount of singing. I do not remember who sang, but the lines have stuck with me since. They are a part of an old Eskeocha folk tune, which states, “when the fish have gone to bed and the sea dried up, we will go on, we will go on.” I was terrified of the song at the time. I heard tunes of an apocalypse, of all the food in the world disappearing. I loved food! I also remember my uncle telling a story about one of the great gods, descending from on high to visit the humans she had created. It was all quite fun, and I can remember eating a healthy amount of fish dishes, though what has always stuck with me most was, as is traditional for any potlatch, the giving of gifts. My cousin had gifted me with a small model totem. It was the original miniature sample he had made of the one that stands in town. I remember staring at that small chunk of wood for hours; I had my very own totem, something only great members of the Eskeocha tribe receive, unless they make one themselves. I would not let that totem out of my hand for the next twelve hours, holding it as tight as my stubby six year old fingers would let me. The totem in Nintook town center, created by Lotel Barokog. At age fourteen I began my first job. After school, I would work part time as a retail clerk in a small store in town that sold shoes. It was not remotely related to the Eskeocha tribe, we mostly carried boots for the winter and sandals for the summer. I would see multiple customers come and go, but no one unusual beyond the older kooks who lived in town. When I had been working there for about four months, however, a man whom I had never seen, who must have been from a different city, entered the store. From looks alone, no one would assume the man to be anything but a typical customer. He was wearing a flannel top, working denim on the bottom, and the same sandals we sold in the store. Though when he came over to the counter and asked if we had any Koqes, I was quite unprepared. I told him no, we only had sandals and winter boots, and the man thanked me and left, dejected. That afternoon, upon getting off from work, I went to the local library and looked up Koqes in a book on the Eskeocha tribe. It turns out they were a type of sandal designed centuries ago by tribe members designed for full use in water and on land. It essentially acted as a walking sandal and a water shoe, saving time in the day and space, cutting down on changing time and shoe storage. Clever, I thought, though not very necessary anymore. I went home without giving it a second thought. On my nineteenth birthday, I had a potlatch. It was a large, family event, and a few friends were invited. It was to celebrate my transition into adulthood, an event that occurs at nineteen in Eskeochan tradition. I could finally drink (legally), I could vote for our borough captain, not that I had much interest in that, and any property I owned would be recognized officially by the frontier, though at this point I had none. The celebration itself was fun, and my friends and I drank a hefty amount, but what sticks with me is the gift-giving ceremony. I had set aside many items from my childhood to give to others, and I did just that. What I never expected was to be given a gift of my own. My grandfather had given me a set of keys, the keys to his fishing boat. He was retiring, and was offering me the boat as a means to make my own living if I should choose to do so. I had not even owned a house and already I had a boat! It was quite overwhelming, but I knew my grandfather well. I accepted his offer and his fishing job. When I look back at my life, I understand what it means to be a part of the Eskeocha tribe. It is not about crazy attire or wild, cult like celebrations. It is about community, family, and overcoming. Being a part of the tribe is about celebrating what you have been given and have left to give. I observe this every day when I go to my fishing job; there is the same totem on my boat’s dashboard, a reminder that I do not do this for myself, but for others. I wear traditional Koqes, and I can guarantee you they are a game changer in my career! I wear them as a reminder of who I am descended from. And I have renamed my boat after my grandfather, a reminder that when one overcomes, we all overcome. I fill myself with reminders of who I am as a way to stay true to my past and my ancestors’ past. I hope that as you read through this textbook, you will learn some of the same lessons I have learned. I hope you will see the importance of community and perseverance, and that you will think harder about your own background in your life. This book is filled from end to end with stories of my people’s experiences, and I can tell you, after reading an early copy, it is certainly an adventure and a tale that leaves the reader feeling good. Please enjoy the work of my dear friend and her colleague, and I ask you, think, whether you are an Eskeochan or not: how can you be a better member of the Eskeocha tribe?
  10. The town of Mastikan, Eskeocha in the summer All The Gold Money Can Buy SLAP… SLAP… SLAP… The echoing of the ball resonated around the room as Javed caught it, then threw it up again in a repetitive pattern. It was a slow day at work, the kind where tossing a baseball to oneself is considered the most thrilling form of excitement. Javed sighed as he continued his one-man game of catch, no longer paying attention to the ball; he had been doing this so long he knew exactly where the ball would land. The door on the far side of the room opened with a click, and a young woman walked in. She had dark brown, straight hair and a very small face. The was short and thin, and wore the same blue button down shirt and neon yellow vest as Javed, the uniform all tour guides at the Mastikan Gold Mine would wear. “Javed, your 2:30 tour is all signed in,” she said to the man in her thick Eskeok accent. He put on a fake smile as he looked over at her. “Thanks, Ileva,” he responded in the same language. With a sigh and a slight groan, Javed stood up and made his way out the door and into the lobby. He walked down the cream colored hall, past black and white photos of miners and large finds, nuggets of gold the size of fists. As he shuffled towards the main hall, his boots squeaking on the tile all the way, he thought to himself, please, just today, let something new happen. “Hi!” Javed said with a large smile and wide eyes as he addressed the nine people in the room, all here for his tour. He had been doing this job for many months, and had become expert at switching his “tour guide” personality on in an instant. “My name is Javed, and I’m a tour guide here at the Mastikan Gold Mine! I’m very excited to lead you today as you learn all about the history of mining in Mastikan, explore the mine, and even try mining for gold yourself! Before we officially start the tour, I must ask, has everyone here signed the waivers?” This part of the process was always very boring, but very important. If something happened and a waiver was not signed, Jared’s job and money would be on the line. Once he confirmed that the whole group had signed, he continued on. “Welcome to Mastikan Golden Tours! As I said, I am Javed, and I will be taking you around the mine area, as well as into the mine over the course of the next two hours. To give you a little background, Mastikan Golden Tours was founded in 1991 after the shut down of the Mastikan Gold Mine as a way to bring more opportunities for education to the people visiting our borough. It was founded by Arneau Comora, who for the first six years, he and his daughter would take guests on tours around the mine to learn about the history. In 1997, the company was granted permission to open the mine, and in 2007, permission was granted for us to allow our guests to do some mining themselves, giving us the opportunity to take you through the full experience we can share with you today. Now, to get to the mine, we’re going to head out this door to the van, and I will drive us out to our destination.” Javed began shepherding his group out the door with an internal groan. It was going to be just another boring day. “So! Where are you all from?” he asked as they left the building. ——— A photograph of a portion of the interior of the Mastikan Gold Mine The drive out to the mine was less than memorable. Javed could not remember where any of his guests were from, nor what they looked like. They all asked the same questions every group did - “What’s it like living in Mastikan?” “How big is Eskeocha actually?” and “So, how tall is Mt. Caskada?” Javed gave his standard answers, half focusing on his questions and half on the 45 minute drive. There was one decent stretch of conversation, however, that did peak his interest. A man, a father of two, spent a decent amount of time asking Javed where he was from, what he studied in school, and a few other questions about the guide. He was very nice and wound up tipping exceptionally well, though Javed had no reason to know that yet. Upon arriving at the mine, the van pulled up in the small lot with the crunching of tires on gravel. Javed pulled into a corner under the shade of trees and everyone filed out. It was a sunny afternoon, so upon exiting the van with a furrowed brow, the guide squinted as the natural light of the sky beat down on him. What he wouldn’t do to remove his vest and shirt and be wearing only his undershirt. It was still only 56 degrees, a much higher temperature for this area of Eskeocha, but he was sweating nonetheless. “We’re about to enter the mines,” he said, “which were originally operated in full by colonists who arrived in the nation hoping for riches. In the entire time the mine remained open, miners never found gold until the final three years of operation, after which it closed down due to safety concerns. Don’t worry,” Javed assured concerned faces with a chuckle, “today’s technology and safety standards have ensured it is okay for us to go in.” He began walking down the path, towards the mouth of the mine, pursued by his crowd. Aside from one couple in the rear, everyone kept pace. As soon as everyone was inside, Javed began his tour. The guide spend the better part of an hour putting on a show. As dull as his mood was, he felt it had been one of his better performances. He added mystery and intrigue, and drew in his guests with long passed stories. He pulled them in with the story of the 1956 cave-in. He gave a quite compelling reenactment of the first jackpot, the first time anyone had found gold in the mine. He even mentioned the romance between the mine foreman and a young miner, something he only did when he was feeling hot. The crowd laughed, gasped, and asked plenty of questions. By the time they got to the end of the tour portion, his mood had lifted. “Congratulations team,” Javed remarked as the group made their way into a larger cavern, “It’s time for what you’ve been waiting for! In this cavern, you can spend the better part of the next half hour mining for you own gold!” It was most people’s favorite part of the tour. Granted, most visitors never walked out with more gold than a single grain, but there was something about swinging pickaxes at the walls of the cave the visitors loved. The guests, all 16 and above, the required age for participating, all went to work hacking and swinging at the walls. There were laughs, grunts, and the occasional gasp of someone who thought they struck it rich. About four people got their hands on tiny specks, but no one else seemed to find anything. That was, until the kid took his turn. A short teenager, a young blonde boy in a gray shirt and jeans grabbed the pick axe from his older sister and, grasping it firmly by the handle, slammed the point down at the rock. In that initial hit, a few pieces of rock came off the wall and revealed a small shimmer. It’s was no more than the size of a fingernail, but it was bigger than most people ever found. “Hey, hey, look!” the kid yelled. Javed ran over and took a look, surrounded by the other guests. Sure enough, a pebble of gold jutted out of the wall. “That’s the biggest anyone on my tours has found,” Javed said in amazement. Seeming pretty proud, the kid beamed. Javed continued, “you’d better keep digging it out, you only have ten more minutes and can’t leave with anything you haven’t pulled out.” The kid hacked away more and more, then the strangest thing happened. As more rock came off the wall, more and more gold was revealed. The find got bigger and bigger, until finally, with only 30 seconds left, out came a golden nugget the size of an adult man’s fist. It was massive! No one could believe it! Not even Javed! He continued to mutter to himself in disbelief as he walked out. The gods listened to him. They made something interesting happen! Javed finished the tour, returning the group to the building in Mastikan, where the dad placed a one hundred chipre tip in his hand. He barely got out his thank you, then proceeded to mumble about the jackpot as he walked back to the back room. He sat in the chair, picked up the ball, and, not remotely paying attention, began tossing it up again. SLAP… SLAP… SLAP… Events of this story occurred in the Mastikan Gold Mine on July 16th, 2020.
  11. Recent articles on the rising tensions in the southern boroughs Newest Proposal Passes Coalition 19 July 2020 Aven Cordaka A decision has been made today regarding the national status of the Eskeok National Rainforest located in southern Eskeocha. For the past year, a debate has arisen regarding the rights of locals to use trees from the rainforest as a source of local lumber. The harvesting of Eskeok Rainforest trees began last November, when natives of the borough Mastikan began cutting down trees in the eastern sections of the rainforest. This upset many natives and environmental rights supporters, prompting action by the Mastikan borough board. A decision was made in a split vote, 12-10, to allow the use of lumber from the rainforest as a local lumber source, passing in January of this year. South Eskeocha and Cranarie Passage South, two other boroughs that share portions of the rainforest, disputed this decision by Mastikan, claiming Mastikan has no right to make the decision without consultation with the other boroughs since they also share territory. Mastikan disagreed with this claim, stating that each borough is responsible for their own region of the forest. With no eminent solution to the rainforest dispute, as it has grown to be called, South Eskeocha submitted a proposal to the Frontier Coalition, Eskeocha’s national governing body, to declare the rainforest a national monument of heritage. Proposals on this level are infrequent, with only approximately twelve sent to the coalition annually, as Eskeocha’s main governance is delegated to the boroughs. This proposal remained on the floor for six months, lasting from February to July, when, at 4:46pm today, a law was officially passed recognizing the Eskeok National Rainforest as a Monument of Heritage, joining the ranks of the Ontok Glacier and Mt. Caskada. Updates on the story, including details of the proposal and information on Monuments of Heritage will be found on our website, nationalpost.esk . Violence Rises in the Southern Boroughs 20 July 2020 Aven Cordaka Rioting broke out in the city of Jenifer in early hours this morning by employees of the Jenifer Lumber Supply Co. and Eskeocha Timber. Three people were killed in the event, a rare occurrence for Eskeocha. The disturbance is believed to be in direct response to the Frontier Coalition’s passing of the proposal to declare the Eskeok National Rainforest a national monument of heritage, preventing it from being used as a source for timber by lumber supply companies. The two companies whose employees were greatly involved in the riot are significantly impacted by this new law, as the borough board of Mastikan had dispensed permits to multiple companies including these two to begin cutting down wood in the forest in October of last year. Borough Captain Tomas Carapacho of Mastikan released a statement on the riot from the Borough seat in Mastikan city, declaring, “The events of this morning are very unfortunate. Here at the borough seat, the hearts of the board go out to the families of those who passed. We do not condone riots or senseless violence in Mastikan, yet we must also recognize the cause for which these men and women are speaking up. This decision by the Frontier Coalition to prevent our borough from harvesting timber is an infringement on our rights as a borough. Our nation’s charter of confederacy gives explicit rights to the boroughs to govern their land, and this right has been violated. We will not rest until we have been returned our right to collect our lumber where we choose.” South Eskeocha Borough Captain Elder Morokok responded, condemning the statements of Carapacho, calling them “Uninformed” and “Promoting violence and unrest in our nation.” Borough Captain Edder Ediani of Cranarie Passage South and Eskeocha Frontier Captain Milo Yuskwag have yet to respond. Updates on the story, including arrest information and the identities of the three deceased will be found on our website, nationalpost.esk. Fighting Breaks Out in the South 21 July 2020 Aven Cordaka Tensions have begun to rise today in southern Eskeocha as fighting has begun between the boroughs of Mastikan and South Eskeocha. On the border of the two boroughs and of the Eskeok National Rainforest, many citizens of the two nations began brawling violently, leaving twenty-two people severely injured. No one was killed in the fighting. The fighting lasted for almost an hour and a half, as police were hesitant to break anyone up using firearms, as they feared it could lead to citizens beginning to use their hunting weapons for this cause in the future. This is not the first incident of violence as a result of the new lumber laws, as riots broke out in Jenifer a short time ago. Furious over the recent matters involving the restriction of harvesting lumber in the Eskeok National Rainforest, the two boroughs have been targeting each other for the past two weeks politically and in the media, and to this point, the issue has expanded further, becoming a matter of government involvement in the boroughs. Several boroughs including Cranarie Passage South, Passage’s End, and Abasol Bay have declared their support for South Eskeocha, believing the government should play a larger role in national politics, while Harinak, White Tip, and Tokoway have shown support for Mastikan and believe that governing power should remain primarily in the hands of the boroughs. This has increased a political divide in the nation, causing many to fear that the country may introduce political parties for the first time in its 55 year history. Frontier Captain Milo Yuskwag spoke publicly on the matter, stating, “We in the capital condemn the violence we have seen from our brothers and sisters. This is an irresponsible reaction to our lawmaking and shines a bad light on our nation in the eyes of world leaders. We ask that this fighting stops, and that you reconsider how you chose to protest, perhaps by choosing more peaceful means. We do pray for the healing of those who were injured. As well, when the frontier board intervenes, we do it with reason. I believe heartily in the power being relegated to the boroughs, but sometimes national response is necessary.” Citizens of Mastikan appeared unhappy with the response and have begun to claim the Frontier Captain and his board are usurping their power. As the story continues, we will come to you with more information. The timeline of events of the Rainforest Riots can be found on our website, nationalpost.esk . --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Aven Cordaka is a senior reporter for the Eskeocha National Post. He was raised in Abasol, and attended Cranarie University where he received his degree in Communications. Aven has been writing for the National Post for 4 years. His previous works can be seen at nationalpost.esk/avencordaka/articles .
  12. Eskeocha

    The Front Desk

    YOUR RP NATION Full Name of Nation: The Independent Frontier of Eskeocha Government type of nation: Independent Confederated Republic Culture/ethnicity of your nation: Even Blend of First Nation and Western European Immigrants (Scandanavian) Give us a short description of your nation: Eskeocha is a very small in population, but large in land nation where everyone is independent and set in their ways. Quite conservative, the people of Eskeocha prefer their small government and separated towns and cities, though that does not stop them from getting to know all their neighbors, old and new, and showing respect to those with differing beliefs. If a person's opinion is different, there's probably a reason why, any Eskeochan will tell you. The land, largely uninhabited, is occupied by vast mountain ranges, sprawling forests, and beautiful, world-renowned glaciers. It is home to all kinds of species of animal, from the most feeble of prey to the fiercest of predators, as well as the mighty and terrifying moose. It takes a lot to survive in Eskeocha, but in the end, it is always worth it. Take an Eskeochan, if you want beauty and adventure not 100 feet from your door, come to Eskeocha. Do you have an IIWiki page?: I do, though it is currently full of information from the old region I was a part of. As I spend more time here, I will change it to fit the nation as it becomes more invested in Eurth. https://iiwiki.us/wiki/Eskeocha WRITING EXPERIENCE How would you describe your level of experience in regards to roleplaying? I have been an active roleplayer and contributor to my old region for just under two years. I have a ton of roleplaying experience, from national news articles to government dispatches to hot and steamy romances between world leaders to scenes played out between members of my governing body. I have done solo and partnered RP. I even hosted an 8 day role-play event akin to the G8 summit in the real world that was a great success in my old region, including keynote speeches by several nations. How would you describe yourself? I am an avid writer, having studied both English and Theater in my college education. It has helped me become a strong writer and creator, and I have found ways to exercise my skills in the craft, from writing plays to role playing games online. I am very open minded and imaginative, having been designing fake worlds in my head since age 12, and plan to continue doing so wherever and whenever I can. I am also a huge fan of Broadway and American football, so outside of RP, people are always welcome to talk to me about those. RP/Writing samples (if available already): This link will take you to the four Dispatches I posted with this nation in my old region. https://www.nationstates.net/page=rmb_search?rmbsearch-text=Eskeocha&rmbsearch-author=&rmbsearch-region=Anteria&rmbsearch-sort=new This link will take you to my other nation, to the many dispatches I have posted on NS. It includes informational pieces, charters/accords, and even my successful campaign to run the region for a 3 month term. https://www.nationstates.net/page=dispatches/nation=wolfgalia I do not intend for any of these pieces to be canon to my nation in Eurth. I intend to start fresh. These samples are purely to get to know the basics of my style. Do you wish to have a mentor assigned to you to help guide you through the start of your time here? I feel I do not need one, I have a lot of role-playing experience. NATIONSTATES Why do you want to join this region?: After hearing high praise for this region from a friend who recently joined I have decided I want to give my old nation Eskeocha another shot here. I wanted a place that promotes good, strong role-play and is moderated fairly, not on crazy whims of the nations without regard for others. This seems like exactly that, perfect for my nation. Have you ever had trouble with any moderators?: Nope. I even was a moderator for some time in my old region, elected for a 3 month term as regional minister. Do you have any prior experience on NationStates? If so, give a brief accounting of it. I have just under 2 years of experience in NationStates. For 9 months of that, I served on a region's Ministry to run the region, its role-play, and it's moderation, going up in position every three months. I was even the head of the ministry for my final 3 month stint. Are you currently or do you plan to be a member of the NationStates World Assembly? I do not. Eskeocha is small in population and not very government oriented, so it would be entirely out of character. Anything else?: I look forward to having a great time and RPing with everyone! Please let me know if there is anything I should or can do for a better overall experience! Providing any falsified or deliberately misleading information will result in your application being rejected and your access to the forum revoked. By submitting this form, you are indicating that you agree to abide by the community and RP rules of this community. Any breach thereof may result in disciplinary action including but not limited to revoking of forum posting rights, banning from the forum, removal of regional citizenship, and ejection from the region.
  13. Hi, I'm Eskeocha! I'm definitely not new to NS, I have another nation that has been around since August of 2018, though I am new to Eurth and this forum, and am looking forward to participating! Eskeocha is an old nation that I made and never really brought to life, and I figured I should find a new region and give her the existence she deserves! I'm really hyped to RP with you all and bring my lovely dominion to reality!
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